KESQ https://kesq.com NewsChannel 3 Sun, 28 May 2023 15:49:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://kesq.b-cdn.net/2020/08/cropped-favicon-32x32.jpg KESQ https://kesq.com 32 32 Max Verstappen cruises to victory at Monaco Grand Prix, avoiding rain-induced chaos https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/max-verstappen-cruises-to-victory-at-monaco-grand-prix-avoiding-rain-induced-chaos/ https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/max-verstappen-cruises-to-victory-at-monaco-grand-prix-avoiding-rain-induced-chaos/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 15:46:23 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/max-verstappen-cruises-to-victory-at-monaco-grand-prix-avoiding-rain-induced-chaos/ By Issy Ronald, CNN (CNN) — Max Verstappen cruised to victory at the Monaco Grand Prix on Sunday, his fourth win in six races this season as he extended his lead at the top of the drivers’ standings. A relatively straightforward race was transformed in the closing stages as it began raining in Monaco, causing

The post Max Verstappen cruises to victory at Monaco Grand Prix, avoiding rain-induced chaos appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
By Issy Ronald, CNN

(CNN) — Max Verstappen cruised to victory at the Monaco Grand Prix on Sunday, his fourth win in six races this season as he extended his lead at the top of the drivers’ standings.

A relatively straightforward race was transformed in the closing stages as it began raining in Monaco, causing chaos all through the field as the drivers fought to keep their cars from sliding on the wet track.

Verstappen avoided any potential mishaps, while second-placed Fernando Alonso lost time when he had to pit twice after attempting to avoid using intermediate tires.

Alonso eventually held onto second while Esteban Ocon rounded out the podium in third.

“It was quite a difficult one because we were on the medium and Fernando was on the hard. We didn’t want to go that long but we had to stay out with the rain coming,” Verstappen told Sky Sports.

“It was incredibly slippery and when you are that far in the lead, you don’t want to push to hard but also you don’t want to lose too much time, so it’s quite difficult in that scenario. I clipped the wall a few times and it was super difficult out there. But that’s Monaco.

“It’s super nice to win it in the way we did today with the weather and everything, to stay calm and bring it home.”

Verstappen asserted his dominance from the very start, fending off Alonso on the first corner and immediately opening a gap over the rest of the field on the narrow, twisting street circuit.

Meanwhile, his teammate Sergio Perez began the race at the back of the grid following a crash in qualifying and he pitted almost immediately in the hope that he could pick off those in front of him when they pitted later in the race, but he eventually finished 16th and outside the points.

As his tires began degrading, Verstappen’s lead over Alonso slipped somewhat – but remained a healthy seven seconds – as the race approached the halfway point. Both remained out on the track, wary of slipping up strategically and pitting at the wrong time.

The strategic calculations changed once again when it began raining in the last third of the race and Alonso and Aston Martin pitted but did not change onto intermediate tires, forcing them to pit again shortly afterwards as the rain kept falling.

That extra pit stop gave Verstappen a comfortable buffer, even as he clipped the wall, as he held on for the win.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Max Verstappen cruises to victory at Monaco Grand Prix, avoiding rain-induced chaos appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/max-verstappen-cruises-to-victory-at-monaco-grand-prix-avoiding-rain-induced-chaos/feed/ 0 ]]>
More businesses require teens to be chaperoned by adults, curbing their independence https://kesq.com/news/ap-national-business/2023/05/28/more-businesses-require-teens-to-be-chaperoned-by-adults-curbing-their-independence/ Sun, 28 May 2023 15:19:17 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/more-businesses-require-teens-to-be-chaperoned-by-adults-curbing-their-independence/

By ANNE D’INNOCENZIO AP Retail Writer PARAMUS, N.J. (AP) — Jennifer Sepulveda used to drop off her 14-year-old son, Jorden, at the local mall on a Friday or Saturday night, where he would catch a movie with his friends and then hang out afterwards at the food court or elsewhere. Not anymore. Starting April 18,

The post More businesses require teens to be chaperoned by adults, curbing their independence appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

By ANNE D’INNOCENZIO
AP Retail Writer

PARAMUS, N.J. (AP) — Jennifer Sepulveda used to drop off her 14-year-old son, Jorden, at the local mall on a Friday or Saturday night, where he would catch a movie with his friends and then hang out afterwards at the food court or elsewhere.

Not anymore.

Starting April 18, Garden State Plaza in Paramus, New Jersey — the second largest mall in the state — is requiring anyone under 18 years old to be accompanied by a chaperone at least 21 or older on Fridays and Saturdays after 5 p.m.

The move, according to the mall, follows “an increase in disruptive behavior by a small minority of younger visitors.” That included a reported brawl in the food court last year and a fight in March that brought swarms of policemen to the center but ended up being a smaller altercation than initially reported.

Sepulveda of Passaic, New Jersey said she was fine with the new policy.

“On Friday and Saturdays, it’s just been a madhouse,” she said on a recent Friday night while shopping for Mother’s Day gifts with Jorden and her 4-month-old daughter.

Jorden, on the other hand, was disappointed. Although he acknowledged the frequent mall fights, he lamented, “It was the main place to go and roam around and hang out with my friends, and I am sad.”

Requiring an adult chaperone at malls, at least for certain times of the day, is not new. Mall of America, the nation’s largest shopping mall, imposed a chaperone policy back in 1996 and has been increasingly tightening it as recently as 2020 when it mandated that teens be accompanied by adults after 3 p.m. daily.

But experts say Garden State Plaza joins a growing number of shopping centers, amusement parks and even a few restaurants that have implemented similar policies in the last few months ahead of the summer season. And they all cite increased incidents of bad behavior among teens as the reason, some of it inspired by social media like TikTok.

Even a Chik-fil-A franchise in southeast Pennsylvania caused a stir with its social media post earlier this year that announced its policy of banning kids under 16 without an adult chaperone, citing unruly behavior.

Violent crime arrests among youth had actually been on the decline for years, falling to a new low in 2020, according to the latest federal data. The number of youth homicide victims, however, increased 30% from 2019 to 2020 –- the biggest one-year increase since at least 1980, the report found. In the years since 2020, authorities in some areas report a rise in crime among youth, including New York, Washington, D.C. and Colorado.

Many praise chaperone policies as a way to reduce disruptions to business and create a safer shopping environment. But some critics say the new parental controls hurt teens’ independence and social development already curbed by pandemic-induced lockdowns.

Shopping malls, hanging out at amusement parks, grabbing a shake at a fast-food joint and watching a movie at a local theater with friends are still long considered the rites of passage to adulthood even as many teens shift to online games and social media. So the question is: What other public spaces can teens congregate to get away from their tablets and phones — as well as their parents?

“We have to allow spaces for young people to be independent and develop socially beyond the context of the virtual digital environment,” said Jake Bjorseth, who runs trndsttrs, an agency helping retailers and brands understand and reach the Gen Z population.

Bjorseth noted the pandemic only further hampered social development for Gen Zers. He called the new chaperone measures too extreme and said they could backfire on malls and other traditional physical hangouts by helping to accelerate the shift to online that parents wanted to avoid.

Jorden said he only spends half his free time with his friends at Garden State Plaza and other shopping centers; the rest of the time he plays online games. He said the new policy at the mall will likely push him to another mall that has no chaperone policy — or even more online.

Marshal Cohen, chief industry adviser at market research firm Circana, noted the policies aren’t just about enhancing safety but adjusting to post-pandemic times, with teens markedly pulling back on purchases compared with other age groups.

Adults ages 55 and older spent 5% more in 2022 compared to the previous year, with the other age groups combined spending 2% lower, according data from Circana. Meanwhile, spending by those in the 18- to 24-year old category fell by 8%.

Cohen said the restrictions will help boost spending among adults who must now accompany kids but they will also likely reduce the number of trips by teens, so the overall financial impact is unclear.

At Garden State Plaza on a recent Friday night, the chaperone policy was clearly being enforced, with security guards stationed at each entrance and checking IDs of young shoppers they suspected were under 18 and who were not accompanied by an adult chaperone. Some were turned away. A cluster of policemen were also at the gates.

Meanwhile, several amusement parks with chaperone policies are generally requiring teens 15 years old or younger to be accompanied with adult chaperones after 3 p.m. or 4 p.m. every day. The largest group has been amusement park operator Cedar Fair Entertainment Co., which recently implemented adult chaperone policies for at least eight of its 13 parks including Worlds of Fun in Kansas City, Missouri, and King Dominion in Doswell, Virginia.

“Over the past two years, we have seen increasing incidents of unruly and inappropriate behavior across our industry and at other major entertainment venues,” said Gary Rhodes, a spokesman for Cedar Fair in a statement. “We believe these changes will help ensure that our parks continue to provide a safe and positive environment.”

At Worlds of Fun, for example, a fight involving more than 100 teenagers broke out during the park’s opening weekend in early April.

Lauren Stansbury, 14, of Raytown, Missouri, was leaving Worlds of Fun, just before 4 p.m. on a recent Saturday with her cousin. Both are season pass holders.

“I don’t really like it,” she said, noting that it’s hard to find a parent with time to chaperone. “I think that maybe they should just better their search type thing, like the way that they look for weapons and stuff.”

Some businesses say the new rules have been effective.

The Mall in Columbia, in Columbia, Md., instituted a chaperone policy at the end of March after a rise in disruptive teen behavior over the past eight months, according senior general manager Mary Williams. She said that the weekend scene has turned into a pleasant family atmosphere because of it.

Noah Peters, district manager at three Capital 8 Theater locations in Missouri and Illinois, said that the chaperone policy implemented in Missouri in October 2021 requires teens under 17 to be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian after 6 p.m. And despite some outcry, it has been a “huge success,” citing anywhere from a 80% to 90% reduction in disruptive episodes.

“The reality is that the amount of money we lose turning those without a chaperone away pales to the amount we were losing providing refunds night after night to frustrated guests whose movie going experience was marred by the noise and disruptions,” Peters said.

___

This story corrects the 27th paragraph to fix style of spelling of the mall.

___

Associated Press staff writers Heather Hollingsworth in Mission, Kansas and Lindsay Whitehurst in Washington contributed to this report.

_____

Follow Anne D’Innocenzio: http://twitter.com/ADInnocenzio

The post More businesses require teens to be chaperoned by adults, curbing their independence appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
]]>
Venice authorities investigate after canal turns fluorescent green https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/venice-authorities-investigate-after-canal-turns-fluorescent-green/ https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/venice-authorities-investigate-after-canal-turns-fluorescent-green/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 15:10:35 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/venice-authorities-investigate-after-canal-turns-fluorescent-green/ By Barbie Latza Nadeau and Sophie Tanno, CNN Rome (CNN) — Venetian authorities are investigating after a patch of fluorescent green water appeared in the famed Grand Canal on Sunday morning. “This morning a patch of phosphorescent green liquid appeared in the Grand Canal of Venice, reported by some residents near the Rialto Bridge. The

The post Venice authorities investigate after canal turns fluorescent green appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
By Barbie Latza Nadeau and Sophie Tanno, CNN

Rome (CNN) — Venetian authorities are investigating after a patch of fluorescent green water appeared in the famed Grand Canal on Sunday morning.

“This morning a patch of phosphorescent green liquid appeared in the Grand Canal of Venice, reported by some residents near the Rialto Bridge. The prefect has called an urgent meeting with the police to investigate the origin of the liquid,” Veneto regional president Luca Zaia wrote on Twitter.

The local prefect spokesperson told CNN that they immediately took water samples, reviewed CCTV surveillance tape and asked local gondolier pilots and boat drivers if they saw anything suspicions, before calling an emergency meeting to investigate the cause of the green water, noting that no environmental group had claimed responsibility.

The verdant blob was first noticed around 9:30 a.m. CET (3.30aET) and grew slowly, according to multiple images posted on social media, which showed gondolas, water taxis and water bus boats skimming through the emerald substance.

City councilman Andrea Pegoraro immediately blamed environmental activists who have been attacking Italian cultural heritage sites in recent months.

The group Ultima Generazione, which poured charcoal into the Trevi Fountain in Rome last weekend, told CNN when asked if they were behind the green water, “It wasn’t us.”

Italy’s fire brigade tweeted that they were assisting with providing “samples and technical assistance” to the ARPA Veneto, the regional agency that oversees the environmental state of the Grand Canal, which are “conducting analysis to establish the nature of the substance in the water.”

Various theories surfaced online, including that it could be algae or a substance illegally dispersed in the canal.

This is not the first time Venice’s Grand Canal has experienced a color alteration.

In 1968 Argentine artist Nicolás García Uriburu dyed the waters of the canal green with a fluorescent dye called Fluorescein, during the annual Venice Biennale. The move was designed to bring attention to ecological issues and the relationship between nature and civilization.

The curious coloring comes as the city is celebrating the Vogalonga boat event, created to combat wave motion and to restore Venetian traditions and help spread attention for the environment and nature as well as the architecture Biennale, which opened last weekend.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Venice authorities investigate after canal turns fluorescent green appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/venice-authorities-investigate-after-canal-turns-fluorescent-green/feed/ 0 ]]>
Esto contiene el acuerdo sobre el techo de la deuda en EE.UU. https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/esto-contiene-el-acuerdo-sobre-el-techo-de-la-deuda-en-ee-uu/ https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/esto-contiene-el-acuerdo-sobre-el-techo-de-la-deuda-en-ee-uu/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 14:55:25 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/esto-contiene-el-acuerdo-sobre-el-techo-de-la-deuda-en-ee-uu/ Rocío Muñoz-Ledo (CNN) — Tras varias semanas de tensas negociaciones, el presidente de Estados Unidos, Joe Biden, y los republicanos de la Cámara de Representantes alcanzaron un principio de acuerdo para elevar el techo de la deuda y limitar el gasto. La Casa Blanca y los republicanos de la Cámara llegan a un principio de

The post Esto contiene el acuerdo sobre el techo de la deuda en EE.UU. appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
Rocío Muñoz-Ledo

(CNN) — Tras varias semanas de tensas negociaciones, el presidente de Estados Unidos, Joe Biden, y los republicanos de la Cámara de Representantes alcanzaron un principio de acuerdo para elevar el techo de la deuda y limitar el gasto.

La Casa Blanca y los republicanos de la Cámara llegan a un principio de acuerdo para elevar el techo de la deuda

Pero el drama no ha terminado. Los líderes de ambos partidos en el Congreso tienen que convencer a un número suficiente de sus miembros para que voten a favor del acuerdo, que contiene disposiciones que los legisladores de cada lado del pasillo no apoyan.

Aún no se conocen todos los detalles del acuerdo. Y la información que se hizo pública la noche de este sábado muestra algunas discrepancias. Está previsto que el texto del proyecto de ley se haga público este domingo.

¿Cómo van las negociaciones sobre el techo de la deuda? 0:59

Esto es lo que sabemos del acuerdo, según una hoja informativa distribuida por los republicanos de la Cámara de Representantes y una fuente familiarizada con las negociaciones.

Aumenta el techo de deuda

El acuerdo aumentaría el límite de deuda durante dos años.

Limita el gasto no destinado a defensa

Según el acuerdo, el gasto no destinado a defensa se mantendría relativamente estable en el año fiscal 2024 y aumentaría un 1% en el año fiscal 2025, después de que se realizaran ciertos ajustes no especificados en las asignaciones, según la fuente.

Después del año fiscal 2025, habría objetivos de créditos, pero no serían ejecutables, según la fuente.

La hoja informativa del Partido Republicano de la Cámara de Representantes dice que el gasto discrecional no relacionado con la defensa se retrotraería a los niveles del año fiscal 2022 y que el gasto federal total se limitaría a un crecimiento anual del 1% durante los próximos seis años.

El proyecto de ley sobre el techo de la deuda que los republicanos de la Cámara de Representantes aprobaron el mes pasado devolvería el gasto discrecional a los niveles del año fiscal 2022 y luego limitaría el crecimiento del gasto al 1% durante una década. El gasto en defensa quedaría protegido.

Protege la atención médica a los veteranos

El acuerdo mantendría la financiación completa para la atención médica de los veteranos y aumentaría el apoyo al fondo de exposición tóxica de la Ley PACT en casi US$ 15.000 millones para el año fiscal 2024, según la fuente.

La hoja informativa del Partido Republicano de la Cámara dice que la atención médica de los veteranos estaría totalmente financiada.

Los pagos de la Seguridad Social en EE.UU. podrían retrasarse por el estancamiento del techo de deuda

Amplía los requisitos laborales

El acuerdo prevé ampliar temporalmente los requisitos de trabajo para ciertos adultos que reciben cupones de alimentos.

En la actualidad, los adultos sin hijos y sanos de entre 18 y 49 años sólo pueden recibir cupones de alimentos durante tres meses cada tres años, a menos que trabajen al menos 20 horas a la semana o cumplan otros requisitos. El acuerdo elevaría la edad a 54 años, según la fuente. La hoja informativa del Partido Republicano dice que se aplicaría a quienes tuvieran hasta 55 años.

Sin embargo, el acuerdo también ampliaría las exenciones para los veteranos, las personas sin hogar y otras personas en el Programa de Asistencia Nutricional Suplementaria, o SNAP, como se conoce formalmente a los cupones de alimentos.

Y todos los cambios finalizarían en 2030.

El acuerdo también introduciría cambios en los actuales requisitos laborales del programa de Asistencia Temporal para Familias Necesitadas.

Los requisitos laborales no se introducirían en Medicaid, algo que los republicanos de la Cámara de Representantes pidieron en su proyecto de ley sobre el techo de la deuda.

Recuperar los fondos de ayuda del covid-19 no gastados

El acuerdo rescindiría los fondos no comprometidos de los paquetes de ayuda covid-19 que el Congreso aprobó para responder a la pandemia, según la hoja informativa del Partido Republicano en la Cámara de Representantes.

Las estimaciones sobre la cantidad restante de los aproximadamente US$ 4,5 billones de ayuda varían.

¿Qué es el techo de la deuda en EE.UU. y por qué preocupa tanto la amenaza de impago? Lo que debes saber

Recortar la financiación del IRS

El acuerdo cancelaría la solicitud total de financiación de personal para el año fiscal 2023 que, según el GOP de la Cámara, se destinaría a nuevos agentes del Servicio de Impuestos Internos (IRS, por sus siglas en inglés), según la hoja informativa.

Los republicanos de la Cámara de Representantes se empeñaron en cancelar los cerca de US$ 80.000 millones de financiación del IRS incluidos en la Ley de Reducción de la Inflación que los demócratas aprobaron el año pasado. Los legisladores del GOP argumentan que el dinero se utilizará para contratar a un ejército de nuevos agentes para auditar a los estadounidenses, pero la agencia dice que también se utilizará para apoyar las operaciones, modernizar la tecnología de servicio al cliente y ayudar a los contribuyentes.

Reanudar el pago de los préstamos estudiantiles

El acuerdo obligaría a los prestatarios a devolver de nuevo sus préstamos estudiantiles, según la hoja informativa del Partido Republicano en la Cámara de Representantes, aunque no se especifica cuándo comenzarían los reembolsos. Están en pausa desde que comenzó la pandemia del covid-19.

Sin embargo, el acuerdo mantendría el plan de Biden de ofrecer hasta US$ 20.000 de alivio de la deuda a los prestatarios que cumplan los requisitos, dijo la fuente. La medida se encuentra actualmente ante el Tribunal Supremo, que se espera que se pronuncie sobre ella en las próximas semanas.

Priscilla Alvarez, Alayna Treene y Lauren Fox de CNN contribuyeron a este reporte.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Esto contiene el acuerdo sobre el techo de la deuda en EE.UU. appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/esto-contiene-el-acuerdo-sobre-el-techo-de-la-deuda-en-ee-uu/feed/ 0 ]]>
‘The Little Mermaid’ shines, thanks to Halle Bailey and a warm wave of nostalgia https://kesq.com/entertainment/cnn-entertainment/2023/05/28/the-little-mermaid-shines-thanks-to-halle-bailey-and-a-warm-wave-of-nostalgia-2/ https://kesq.com/entertainment/cnn-entertainment/2023/05/28/the-little-mermaid-shines-thanks-to-halle-bailey-and-a-warm-wave-of-nostalgia-2/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 14:52:05 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/the-little-mermaid-shines-thanks-to-halle-bailey-and-a-warm-wave-of-nostalgia-2/ Halle Bailey in Disney's live-action "The Little Mermaid."

CNN Review by Brian Lowry, CNN (CNN) — As the movie that began Disney’s animation renaissance in 1989, a live-action “The Little Mermaid” comes with big fins to fill. Thanks largely to star Halle Bailey, the lavish musical holds up nicely under the weight of those expectations, preserving the original’s essence while updating undernourished aspects

The post ‘The Little Mermaid’ shines, thanks to Halle Bailey and a warm wave of nostalgia appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
Halle Bailey in Disney's live-action "The Little Mermaid."


CNN

Review by Brian Lowry, CNN

(CNN) — As the movie that began Disney’s animation renaissance in 1989, a live-action “The Little Mermaid” comes with big fins to fill. Thanks largely to star Halle Bailey, the lavish musical holds up nicely under the weight of those expectations, preserving the original’s essence while updating undernourished aspects of it and riding a warm, hard-to-resist wave of nostalgia.

Older kids might be jaded about the prospect of heading under the sea again, but parents and younger ones should find a lot to like in the studio’s latest exercise in leaving no intellectual property unexploited. While that has produced a mixed bag of live-action adaptations, “The Little Mermaid” happily falls more toward the “Beauty and the Beast” end of the gene pool than, say, “Dumbo” or the recent Disney+ misfire “Pinocchio.”

At first blush, theater-goers might wonder why this retelling would pad roughly 50 minutes onto the length of the animated hit, probably remembering more about its colorful songs than its love-at-first-sight story.

Working with writer David Magee and producer/Broadway standout Lin-Manuel Miranda (who has contributed new lyrics to augment Howard Ashman and Alan Menken’s classics), director Rob Marshall (whose musical credentials include “Chicago” and “Into the Woods”) answers that by fleshing out not just Bailey’s Ariel but the object of her affection, Prince Eric (Jonah Hauer-King), who gets a new ballad and more backstory.

When the movie was announced, it was difficult to fathom the unhinged reaction from the dankest quadrants of social media and the racism from trolls in response to Bailey’s casting. Seeing her inhabit the role with wide-eyed wonder, and gloriously belt out songs like “Part of Your World,” underscores that the producers chose wisely, which extends across the board to Melissa McCarthy as the evil Ursula, who leverages Ariel’s longing in her thirst for power; and Javier Bardem, who somehow manages to rock a crown and trident as King Triton.

Marshall bombards the audience with “Aquaman”-like visuals right off the bat, conveying the grandeur of the undersea kingdom as well as Ariel’s restlessness. When she finally does sing, the familiarity of the signature song “Part of Your World” makes the experience almost interactive, prompting spontaneous applause as if this were an actual musical.

There are some tweaks to the playlist, including a rap number for the absent-minded bird Scuttle (Awkwafina), bringing “Kiss the Girl” into the 21st century and dispensing with the culinary tune about cooking poor Sebastian (Daveed Diggs), whose role is otherwise undiminished. (Advance fretting about how the sea creatures look turns out to be much ado about nothing, though nitpicking with this sort of endeavor is inevitable.)

The heart of “The Little Mermaid,” however, remains very much intact. On the plus side, letting Ariel and Eric spend more quality time together once she’s on land makes the romance more organic. On the down side, the climactic confrontation with Ursula proves underwhelming, but it was among the weaker elements in the original as well.

An undertaking like “The Little Mermaid” obviously comes with various peripheral concerns for Disney, from merchandising to its theme parks. The movie manages the daunting task of treating the material with earnest reverence without being entirely shackled by it.

Viewed from that shore, “The Little Mermaid” is both slick and satisfying, meeting the primary challenge of allowing parents and kids to create memories around seeing it together. Setting aside its other assets, Bailey’s out-of-this-world contribution alone serves up the kind of splashy entertainment that justifies getting out of the summer sun, and in terms of being enjoyed far beyond that, might even have legs.

“The Little Mermaid” premieres May 26 in US theaters. It’s rated PG.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post ‘The Little Mermaid’ shines, thanks to Halle Bailey and a warm wave of nostalgia appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/entertainment/cnn-entertainment/2023/05/28/the-little-mermaid-shines-thanks-to-halle-bailey-and-a-warm-wave-of-nostalgia-2/feed/ 0 ]]>
Here’s what’s in the debt ceiling deal https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/heres-whats-in-the-debt-ceiling-deal-4/ https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/heres-whats-in-the-debt-ceiling-deal-4/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 14:41:20 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/heres-whats-in-the-debt-ceiling-deal-4/ CNN By Tami Luhby, CNN (CNN) — After several weeks of tense negotiations, President Joe Biden and House Republicans have reached an agreement in principle to raise the debt ceiling and cap spending. The drama is by no means over. Congressional leaders in both parties have to convince enough of their members to vote for

The post Here’s what’s in the debt ceiling deal appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

CNN

By Tami Luhby, CNN

(CNN) — After several weeks of tense negotiations, President Joe Biden and House Republicans have reached an agreement in principle to raise the debt ceiling and cap spending.

The drama is by no means over. Congressional leaders in both parties have to convince enough of their members to vote for the agreement, which contains provisions that lawmakers on each side of the aisle don’t support.

Not all the details of the agreement are available yet. And the information made public Saturday evening shows some discrepancies. The bill text is scheduled to be released on Sunday.

Here’s what we know about the deal, based on a fact sheet circulated by House Republicans and a source familiar with the negotiations.

Raises the debt ceiling: The agreement would increase the debt limit for two years.

Caps non-defense spending: Under the deal, non-defense spending would remain relatively flat in fiscal 2024 and increase by 1% in fiscal 2025, after certain unspecified adjustments to appropriations were made, according to the source.

After fiscal 2025, there would be appropriations targets, but they would not be enforceable, according to the source.

The House GOP fact sheet says that non-defense discretionary spending would be rolled back to fiscal 2022 levels and topline federal spending would be limited to 1% annual growth for the next six years.

The debt ceiling bill that House Republicans passed last month would return discretionary spending to fiscal 2022 levels and then limit the growth in spending to 1% for a decade. Defense spending would be protected.

Protects veterans’ medical care: The deal would maintain full funding for veterans’ health care and would increase support for the PACT Act’s toxic exposure fund by nearly $15 billion for fiscal year 2024, according to the source.

The House GOP fact sheet says veterans’ medical care would be fully funded.

Expands work requirements: The agreement calls for temporarily broadening of work requirements for certain adults receiving food stamps.

Currently, childless, able-bodied adults ages 18 to 49 are only able to get food stamps for three months out of every three years unless they are employed at least 20 hours a week or meet other criteria. The deal would raise the age to 54, according to the source. The GOP fact sheet says it would apply to those up to age 55.

However, the deal would also expand exemptions for veterans, people who are homeless and others in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, as food stamps are formally known.

And all the changes would end in 2030.

The agreement would also make changes to the current work requirements in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program.

Work requirements would not be introduced in Medicaid, which House Republicans had called for in their debt ceiling bill.

Claw back unspent Covid-19 relief funds: The deal would rescind unobligated funds from the Covid-19 relief packages that Congress passed to respond to the pandemic, according to the House GOP fact sheet.

Estimates on how much of the roughly $4.5 trillion in relief remains vary.

Cut Internal Revenue Service funding: The agreement would cancel the total fiscal year 2023 staffing funding request that the House GOP says would go for new IRS agents, according to the fact sheet.

House Republicans have been determined to cancel the roughly $80 billion in IRS funding contained in the Inflation Reduction Act that Democrats passed last year. The GOP lawmakers argue that the money will be used to hire an army of new agents to audit Americans, but the agency says it will also be used to support operations, modernize customer service technology and assist taxpayers.

Restart student loan repayments: The deal would require borrowers to pay back their student loans again, according to the House GOP fact sheet, although when repayments would start is not specified. They have been paused since the Covid-19 pandemic began.

However, the agreement would maintain Biden’s plan to provide up to $20,000 in debt relief for qualifying borrowers, the source said. The measure is currently before the Supreme Court, which is expected to rule on it in coming weeks.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

CNN’s Priscilla Alvarez, Alayna Treene and Lauren Fox contributed to this report.

The post Here’s what’s in the debt ceiling deal appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/heres-whats-in-the-debt-ceiling-deal-4/feed/ 0 ]]>
Here’s what’s in the debt ceiling deal https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/heres-whats-in-the-debt-ceiling-deal-3/ https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/heres-whats-in-the-debt-ceiling-deal-3/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 14:41:20 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/heres-whats-in-the-debt-ceiling-deal-3/ CNN By Tami Luhby, CNN (CNN) — After several weeks of tense negotiations, President Joe Biden and House Republicans have reached an agreement in principle to raise the debt ceiling and cap spending. The drama is by no means over. Congressional leaders in both parties have to convince enough of their members to vote for

The post Here’s what’s in the debt ceiling deal appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

CNN

By Tami Luhby, CNN

(CNN) — After several weeks of tense negotiations, President Joe Biden and House Republicans have reached an agreement in principle to raise the debt ceiling and cap spending.

The drama is by no means over. Congressional leaders in both parties have to convince enough of their members to vote for the agreement, which contains provisions that lawmakers on each side of the aisle don’t support.

Not all the details of the agreement are available yet. And the information made public Saturday evening shows some discrepancies. The bill text is scheduled to be released on Sunday.

Here’s what we know about the deal, based on a fact sheet circulated by House Republicans and a source familiar with the negotiations.

Raises the debt ceiling: The agreement would increase the debt limit for two years.

Caps non-defense spending: Under the deal, non-defense spending would remain relatively flat in fiscal 2024 and increase by 1% in fiscal 2025, after certain unspecified adjustments to appropriations were made, according to the source.

After fiscal 2025, there would be appropriations targets, but they would not be enforceable, according to the source.

The House GOP fact sheet says that non-defense discretionary spending would be rolled back to fiscal 2022 levels and topline federal spending would be limited to 1% annual growth for the next six years.

The debt ceiling bill that House Republicans passed last month would return discretionary spending to fiscal 2022 levels and then limit the growth in spending to 1% for a decade. Defense spending would be protected.

Protects veterans’ medical care: The deal would maintain full funding for veterans’ health care and would increase support for the PACT Act’s toxic exposure fund by nearly $15 billion for fiscal year 2024, according to the source.

The House GOP fact sheet says veterans’ medical care would be fully funded.

Expands work requirements: The agreement calls for temporarily broadening of work requirements for certain adults receiving food stamps.

Currently, childless, able-bodied adults ages 18 to 49 are only able to get food stamps for three months out of every three years unless they are employed at least 20 hours a week or meet other criteria. The deal would raise the age to 54, according to the source. The GOP fact sheet says it would apply to those up to age 55.

However, the deal would also expand exemptions for veterans, people who are homeless and others in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, as food stamps are formally known.

And all the changes would end in 2030.

The agreement would also make changes to the current work requirements in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program.

Work requirements would not be introduced in Medicaid, which House Republicans had called for in their debt ceiling bill.

Claw back unspent Covid-19 relief funds: The deal would rescind unobligated funds from the Covid-19 relief packages that Congress passed to respond to the pandemic, according to the House GOP fact sheet.

Estimates on how much of the roughly $4.5 trillion in relief remains vary.

Cut Internal Revenue Service funding: The agreement would cancel the total fiscal year 2023 staffing funding request that the House GOP says would go for new IRS agents, according to the fact sheet.

House Republicans have been determined to cancel the roughly $80 billion in IRS funding contained in the Inflation Reduction Act that Democrats passed last year. The GOP lawmakers argue that the money will be used to hire an army of new agents to audit Americans, but the agency says it will also be used to support operations, modernize customer service technology and assist taxpayers.

Restart student loan repayments: The deal would require borrowers to pay back their student loans again, according to the House GOP fact sheet, although when repayments would start is not specified. They have been paused since the Covid-19 pandemic began.

However, the agreement would maintain Biden’s plan to provide up to $20,000 in debt relief for qualifying borrowers, the source said. The measure is currently before the Supreme Court, which is expected to rule on it in coming weeks.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

CNN’s Priscilla Alvarez, Alayna Treene and Lauren Fox contributed to this report.

The post Here’s what’s in the debt ceiling deal appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/heres-whats-in-the-debt-ceiling-deal-3/feed/ 0 ]]>
Indy500: How to watch ‘the biggest sporting event in the world’ where Katherine Legge will be the only woman on the start line https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/indy500-how-to-watch-the-biggest-sporting-event-in-the-world-where-katherine-legge-will-be-the-only-woman-on-the-start-line/ https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/indy500-how-to-watch-the-biggest-sporting-event-in-the-world-where-katherine-legge-will-be-the-only-woman-on-the-start-line/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 14:38:37 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/indy500-how-to-watch-the-biggest-sporting-event-in-the-world-where-katherine-legge-will-be-the-only-woman-on-the-start-line/ By Thomas Schlachter and Don Riddell, CNN (CNN) — It’s time to fasten your seatbelts. After two weeks of testing, practice and qualifying, the drivers are now ready to start their engines and step on the gas ahead of the 2023 Indy 500. The race has become a must-watch on the sporting calendar, known for

The post Indy500: How to watch ‘the biggest sporting event in the world’ where Katherine Legge will be the only woman on the start line appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
By Thomas Schlachter and Don Riddell, CNN

(CNN) — It’s time to fasten your seatbelts.

After two weeks of testing, practice and qualifying, the drivers are now ready to start their engines and step on the gas ahead of the 2023 Indy 500.

The race has become a must-watch on the sporting calendar, known for its incredibly high speeds and daring maneuvers. This year’s race will be no different as 33 IndyCar drivers all look to write their name in racing history with victory in “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing”.

“It is the biggest sporting event in the world, right?” British driver Katherine Legge told CNN Sport’s Don Riddell. “With regards to attendance, it has a life of its own.”

This year, there could be in excess of 300,000 people in attendance at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, all contributing to the electric atmosphere.

“As you drive in under the tunnel, you get goosebumps, the whole place just has this feeling about it, this personality that it takes on and when it’s full of fans, it’s just the most incredible feeling like it has a pulse almost.

“I know that there are a lot of big races and I take a part in a lot of big races like Daytona and it has a similar feeling, but this is honestly the most incredible special race,” adds Legge.

How to watch

Held on Sunday May 28, the Indy 500 is broadcast live from 9:00 a.m. ET on Peacock. It will then be shown on NBC at 11:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. ET.

For countries without traditional IndyCar broadcasting contracts, the race organizers have launched IndyCar Live! – a subscription streaming service.

A full list of countries in which the streaming service can be accessed is here, while a list of international broadcasters can be found here.

One place where TV coverage will not be available is in the race’s hometown of Indianapolis.

Unless the 240,000 reserved grandstand seats sell out, there is a television blackout to encourage residents to buy tickets instead of watching the race at home.

What happened last year?

Marcus Ericsson of Honda survived a late challenge to win the 2022 Indy 500 and earned the rights to the coveted Borg-Warner Trophy and to celebrate on the podium with the traditional bottle of milk.

Ericsson was ahead by three seconds with five laps to go and flying to a win when Jimmie Johnson crashed into the wall, causing a red flag that temporarily stopped the race and set up a final sprint to the finish.

On the restart, Ericsson fought off an encroaching Pato O’Ward to win the race for the first time in his career.

‘If you see it, you can be it’

The 2023 edition of Indy 500 will be Legge’s third time competing in the famous race, having previously been on the track in 2012 and 2013.

The 42-year-old had an enjoyable start to her third time in Indianapolis for the race, becoming the fastest woman ever to go round the track during qualifying for the big day. Legge called the achievement “awesome.”

The driver set an incredible average speed of 231.07 miles per hour when racing for the Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing team.

“What’s really awesome is that in the 10 years since I’ve raced here before, I’ve noticed that there’s so many more women fans here and there’s so many more women in the paddock and, like, it was mostly men, I would say 10 years ago, and now I think it’s close to 50-50,” the Surrey native continued.

Legge is often the only woman racer amongst a male-dominated field – just like this year – and has become a trailblazer for generations to come. But this was never something the veteran racer was expecting.

“When you set out racing, you don’t set out to be a trailblazer or a role model or any of those things, right?

“You are focused on Katherine and being the best race car driver that I can be. You’re very selfish and you just work your way through and then at some point comes the realization that you are a role model and with that comes responsibility.”

Although it was never foreseen, Legge is proud to embrace her role, not just in racing, but in inspiring young girls to do anything they want.

“While I don’t set out to do that, I do appreciate that that’s what happens,” Legge explains. “A lot of young girls look up to me and I think more importantly, they look up to me because then they believe that they can be anything they want to be, right?

“When you’re a kid, you want to be a fighter pilot or a fireman or a race car driver or something like that and so traditionally, they’re very male dominated and if you see it, you can be it.”

This year, nominative determinism’s Adam Driver has been named the honorary starter to kick things off on Sunday.

The starter used to say “gentlemen, start your engines,” but now they exclaim “drivers start your engines.” Legge also remembers a time when women weren’t even allowed in the pit lane.

“We’ve come a long way since then,” Legge said. “At the end of the day, there’s been nine women – I’m one of the nine – that have competed in the Indy 500, nine in 107 years.”

Despite Legge’s knowhow, racing at such a prestigious event is still a daunting experience. During qualifying, the British racer thought she was feeling fine but suddenly nerves started to creep in.

“This year I’m older and I’m more mature and I’m more likely to be able to handle taking it all in when they sing ‘Back Home Again, Indiana,’ and the flyover and everything’s going on.

“I’m like: ‘I’m gonna really enjoy it this year. I’m gonna make my memories instead of blacking it all out,’ and then yesterday happened, I’m like: ‘Maybe I won’t, I still have to put my blinkers back on.’”

Legge is still unsure of what to expect on Sunday, but her experience and years of racing could prove vital if she is to win the race and the coveted bottle of milk.

“I am vegan,” Legge explains. “I would like to be drinking vegan milk, but we are sponsored by the Dairy Association. So I think I chose full fat and I’m just gonna pour it over me. I’m gonna have a milk bath if I win.”

In Monday’s practice, Legge was involved in the first crash of the month. The RLL driver smashed into the back of fellow British driver Stefan Wilson as the field slowed down.

As a result of the crash, Wilson has since been forced to withdraw from the big race with a fracture of the 12th thoracic vertebrae.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

CNN’s Issy Ronald and Eric Levenson contributed to reporting.

The post Indy500: How to watch ‘the biggest sporting event in the world’ where Katherine Legge will be the only woman on the start line appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/indy500-how-to-watch-the-biggest-sporting-event-in-the-world-where-katherine-legge-will-be-the-only-woman-on-the-start-line/feed/ 0 ]]>
Indy500: How to watch ‘the biggest sporting event in the world’ where Katherine Legge will be the only woman on the start line https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/indy500-how-to-watch-the-biggest-sporting-event-in-the-world-where-katherine-legge-will-be-the-only-woman-on-the-start-line-2/ https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/indy500-how-to-watch-the-biggest-sporting-event-in-the-world-where-katherine-legge-will-be-the-only-woman-on-the-start-line-2/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 14:38:37 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/indy500-how-to-watch-the-biggest-sporting-event-in-the-world-where-katherine-legge-will-be-the-only-woman-on-the-start-line-2/ CNN By Thomas Schlachter and Don Riddell, CNN (CNN) — It’s time to fasten your seatbelts. After two weeks of testing, practice and qualifying, the drivers are now ready to start their engines and step on the gas ahead of the 2023 Indy 500. The race has become a must-watch on the sporting calendar, known

The post Indy500: How to watch ‘the biggest sporting event in the world’ where Katherine Legge will be the only woman on the start line appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

CNN

By Thomas Schlachter and Don Riddell, CNN

(CNN) — It’s time to fasten your seatbelts.

After two weeks of testing, practice and qualifying, the drivers are now ready to start their engines and step on the gas ahead of the 2023 Indy 500.

The race has become a must-watch on the sporting calendar, known for its incredibly high speeds and daring maneuvers. This year’s race will be no different as 33 IndyCar drivers all look to write their name in racing history with victory in “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing”.

“It is the biggest sporting event in the world, right?” British driver Katherine Legge told CNN Sport’s Don Riddell. “With regards to attendance, it has a life of its own.”

This year, there could be in excess of 300,000 people in attendance at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, all contributing to the electric atmosphere.

“As you drive in under the tunnel, you get goosebumps, the whole place just has this feeling about it, this personality that it takes on and when it’s full of fans, it’s just the most incredible feeling like it has a pulse almost.

“I know that there are a lot of big races and I take a part in a lot of big races like Daytona and it has a similar feeling, but this is honestly the most incredible special race,” adds Legge.

How to watch

Held on Sunday May 28, the Indy 500 is broadcast live from 9:00 a.m. ET on Peacock. It will then be shown on NBC at 11:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. ET.

For countries without traditional IndyCar broadcasting contracts, the race organizers have launched IndyCar Live! – a subscription streaming service.

A full list of countries in which the streaming service can be accessed is here, while a list of international broadcasters can be found here.

One place where TV coverage will not be available is in the race’s hometown of Indianapolis.

Unless the 240,000 reserved grandstand seats sell out, there is a television blackout to encourage residents to buy tickets instead of watching the race at home.

What happened last year?

Marcus Ericsson of Honda survived a late challenge to win the 2022 Indy 500 and earned the rights to the coveted Borg-Warner Trophy and to celebrate on the podium with the traditional bottle of milk.

Ericsson was ahead by three seconds with five laps to go and flying to a win when Jimmie Johnson crashed into the wall, causing a red flag that temporarily stopped the race and set up a final sprint to the finish.

On the restart, Ericsson fought off an encroaching Pato O’Ward to win the race for the first time in his career.

‘If you see it, you can be it’

The 2023 edition of Indy 500 will be Legge’s third time competing in the famous race, having previously been on the track in 2012 and 2013.

The 42-year-old had an enjoyable start to her third time in Indianapolis for the race, becoming the fastest woman ever to go round the track during qualifying for the big day. Legge called the achievement “awesome.”

The driver set an incredible average speed of 231.07 miles per hour when racing for the Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing team.

“What’s really awesome is that in the 10 years since I’ve raced here before, I’ve noticed that there’s so many more women fans here and there’s so many more women in the paddock and, like, it was mostly men, I would say 10 years ago, and now I think it’s close to 50-50,” the Surrey native continued.

Legge is often the only woman racer amongst a male-dominated field – just like this year – and has become a trailblazer for generations to come. But this was never something the veteran racer was expecting.

“When you set out racing, you don’t set out to be a trailblazer or a role model or any of those things, right?

“You are focused on Katherine and being the best race car driver that I can be. You’re very selfish and you just work your way through and then at some point comes the realization that you are a role model and with that comes responsibility.”

Although it was never foreseen, Legge is proud to embrace her role, not just in racing, but in inspiring young girls to do anything they want.

“While I don’t set out to do that, I do appreciate that that’s what happens,” Legge explains. “A lot of young girls look up to me and I think more importantly, they look up to me because then they believe that they can be anything they want to be, right?

“When you’re a kid, you want to be a fighter pilot or a fireman or a race car driver or something like that and so traditionally, they’re very male dominated and if you see it, you can be it.”

This year, nominative determinism’s Adam Driver has been named the honorary starter to kick things off on Sunday.

The starter used to say “gentlemen, start your engines,” but now they exclaim “drivers start your engines.” Legge also remembers a time when women weren’t even allowed in the pit lane.

“We’ve come a long way since then,” Legge said. “At the end of the day, there’s been nine women – I’m one of the nine – that have competed in the Indy 500, nine in 107 years.”

Despite Legge’s knowhow, racing at such a prestigious event is still a daunting experience. During qualifying, the British racer thought she was feeling fine but suddenly nerves started to creep in.

“This year I’m older and I’m more mature and I’m more likely to be able to handle taking it all in when they sing ‘Back Home Again, Indiana,’ and the flyover and everything’s going on.

“I’m like: ‘I’m gonna really enjoy it this year. I’m gonna make my memories instead of blacking it all out,’ and then yesterday happened, I’m like: ‘Maybe I won’t, I still have to put my blinkers back on.’”

Legge is still unsure of what to expect on Sunday, but her experience and years of racing could prove vital if she is to win the race and the coveted bottle of milk.

“I am vegan,” Legge explains. “I would like to be drinking vegan milk, but we are sponsored by the Dairy Association. So I think I chose full fat and I’m just gonna pour it over me. I’m gonna have a milk bath if I win.”

In Monday’s practice, Legge was involved in the first crash of the month. The RLL driver smashed into the back of fellow British driver Stefan Wilson as the field slowed down.

As a result of the crash, Wilson has since been forced to withdraw from the big race with a fracture of the 12th thoracic vertebrae.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

CNN’s Issy Ronald and Eric Levenson contributed to reporting.

The post Indy500: How to watch ‘the biggest sporting event in the world’ where Katherine Legge will be the only woman on the start line appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/indy500-how-to-watch-the-biggest-sporting-event-in-the-world-where-katherine-legge-will-be-the-only-woman-on-the-start-line-2/feed/ 0 ]]>
Dutch police arrest over 1,500 people at Extinction Rebellion protest in The Hague https://kesq.com/news/national-world/cnn-world/2023/05/28/dutch-police-arrest-over-1500-people-at-extinction-rebellion-protest-in-the-hague/ https://kesq.com/news/national-world/cnn-world/2023/05/28/dutch-police-arrest-over-1500-people-at-extinction-rebellion-protest-in-the-hague/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 14:27:29 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/dutch-police-arrest-over-1500-people-at-extinction-rebellion-protest-in-the-hague/ By Mick Krever, Niamh Kennedy and Sophie Tanno, CNN (CNN) — Dutch police arrested over 1,500 people after Extinction Rebellion protesters blocked a motorway in The Hague on Saturday. Hundreds of police were deployed to “maintain public order” during the climate protest, Dutch police said in a press release Saturday. According to police, shortly before

The post Dutch police arrest over 1,500 people at Extinction Rebellion protest in The Hague appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
By Mick Krever, Niamh Kennedy and Sophie Tanno, CNN

(CNN) — Dutch police arrested over 1,500 people after Extinction Rebellion protesters blocked a motorway in The Hague on Saturday.

Hundreds of police were deployed to “maintain public order” during the climate protest, Dutch police said in a press release Saturday.

According to police, shortly before midday local time, the activists descended upon the Utrechtsebaan (A12) motorway, after riot police prevented them for reaching “the underpass that they wanted to block.”

The activists then began protesting in front of the police line, prompting police to “directly” and “repeatedly” ask them to leave, according to the press release.

Extinction Rebellion Netherlands said that police deployed water cannons within 15 minutes of protesters blockading the A12 despite, according to the group, there being “no question of a dangerous or threatening situation.”

Videos of the protest posted in social media showed protesters dressed in swimsuits and raincoats, prepared for the water cannons.

Extinction Rebellion spokesperson, Raki Ap said in the statement that thousands of people had protested “on and next to the A12 with one demand: stop fossil fuel subsidies.”

Dutch actress Carice van Outen, best known for her role as Melisandre in hit TV show, “Game of Thrones,” was reportedly hit by a water cannon and arrested by police at the protest, according to Dutch public broadcaster, NOS. Earlier on Saturday, van Outen posted a video on her Instagram page of musicians playing Beethoven, calling it a “peaceful and musical protest.”

“Most of the activists, 1,539 people, were arrested for violating the Public Demonstrations Act,” the press release said, adding that the Public Prosecution Service will not be pursuing criminal action as it is only a minor criminal offense under Dutch law.

Forty people were arrested for other criminal offenses including obstructing, blocking, vandalism, and insulting, according to the press release. One person was arrested for resisting arrest resulting in injury. These cases remain under review, according to the police.

Arrests in Germany

The arrests in the Netherlands come after Germany’s authorities this week conducted a series of raids against the comparable climate activist group Last Generation.

A total of 15 properties in seven German states were searched as part of the raids conducted on behalf of the Bavarian State Criminal Police Office (LKA) and the Munich General Public Prosecutor’s Office, authorities said.

The Prosecutor General’s Office in Munich said it had initiated a preliminary investigation “due to numerous criminal complaints from the population” against a total of seven defendants aged 22 to 38 years, “on the charge of forming or supporting a criminal organization.”

On Germany’s right, political figures were approving of the authorities’ crackdown on the climate group.

The leader of the centre-right Christian Democratic Union (CDU) Party, Friedrich Merz, wrote on Twitter that causing “mass damage to property, graffiti or memorial plaques, or gluing oneself to the streets or cars are quite simply criminal offenses.”

He added, “It is correct that police and prosecutors are taking action against the Last Generation and those who finance it.”

Some, though, questioned the move. Die Linke (The Left) Member of Parliament Lorenz Gosta Beutin told Bavarian broadcaster Bayerischer Rundfunk prosecutors were “putting themselves above our judiciary and courts.”

A member of parliament for Germany’s Green Party, Helge Limburg, agreed that the “blanket assumption” of the group as criminal was legally questionable in an interview with Redaktionsnetzwerk Deutschland (RND).

The UK in 2020 threatened to class Extinction Rebellion as an organized crime group, which would have seen activists face jail terms of up to five years, although the plans did not come to fruition.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Dutch police arrest over 1,500 people at Extinction Rebellion protest in The Hague appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/news/national-world/cnn-world/2023/05/28/dutch-police-arrest-over-1500-people-at-extinction-rebellion-protest-in-the-hague/feed/ 0 ]]>
Polls close in Turkey as voters choose between Erdogan and Kilicdaroglu in presidential runoff https://kesq.com/news/ap-national-news/2023/05/28/polls-close-in-turkey-as-voters-choose-between-erdogan-and-kilicdaroglu-in-presidential-runoff-2/ Sun, 28 May 2023 14:22:07 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/polls-close-in-turkey-as-voters-choose-between-erdogan-and-kilicdaroglu-in-presidential-runoff-2/

By SUZAN FRASER and ZEYNEP BILGINSOY Associated Press ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey began counting ballots Sunday evening in a runoff presidential race that will decide whether the country’s longtime leader stretches his increasingly authoritarian rule into a third decade, or is unseated by a challenger who has promised to restore a more democratic society.

The post Polls close in Turkey as voters choose between Erdogan and Kilicdaroglu in presidential runoff appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

By SUZAN FRASER and ZEYNEP BILGINSOY
Associated Press

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey began counting ballots Sunday evening in a runoff presidential race that will decide whether the country’s longtime leader stretches his increasingly authoritarian rule into a third decade, or is unseated by a challenger who has promised to restore a more democratic society.

Turkey does not have exit polls, but preliminary results are expected within hours after polls closed at 5 p.m.

The final decision could have implications far beyond Ankara. Turkey stands at the crossroads of Europe and Asia, and it plays a key role in NATO.

Erdogan’s government vetoed Sweden’s bid to join NATO and purchased Russian missile-defense systems, which prompted the United States to oust Turkey from a U.S.-led fighter-jet project. But it also helped broker a crucial deal that allowed Ukrainian grain shipments and averted a global food crisis.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has been at Turkey’s helm for 20 years, was favored to win a new five-year term in the second-round runoff, after coming just short of outright victory in the first round on May 14.

The divisive populist finished four percentage points ahead of Kemal Kilicdaroglu, the candidate of a six-party alliance and leader of Turkey’s center-left main opposition party. Erdogan’s performance came despite crippling inflation and the effects of a devastating earthquake three months ago. It was the first time he didn’t win an election where he ran as a candidate.

The two candidates offered sharply different visions of the country’s future, and its recent past.

“This election took place under very difficult circumstances, there was all sorts of slander and defamation,” the 74-year-old Kilicdaroglu (pronounced KEH-lich-DAHR-OH-loo) told reporters after casting his ballot. “But I trust in the common sense of the people. Democracy will come, freedom will come, people will be able to wander the streets and freely criticize politicians.”

Speaking to reporters after casting his vote at a school in Istanbul, Erdogan noted that it’s the first presidential runoff election in Turkey’s history. He also praised high voter turnout in the first round and said he expected participation to be high again on Sunday. He voted at the same time as Kilicdaroglu, as local television showed the rivals casting ballots on split screens.

“I pray to God, that it (the election) will be beneficial for our country and nation,” he said.

Critics blame Erdogan’s unconventional economic policies for skyrocketing inflation that has fueled a cost-of-living crisis. Many also faulted his government for a slow response to the earthquake that killed more than 50,000 people in Turkey.

In the mainly Kurdish-populated province of Diyarbakir — one of 11 regions that was hit by the Feb. 6 earthquake — 60-year-old retiree Mustafa Yesil said he voted for “change.”

“I’m not happy at all with the way this country is going. Let me be clear, if this current administration continues, I don’t see good things for the future,” he said. “I see that it will end badly — this administration has to change.”

Mehmet Yurttas, an Erdogan supporter, disagreed.

“I believe that our homeland is at the peak, in a very good condition,” the 57-year-old shop owner said. “Our country’s trajectory is very good and it will continue being good.”

Erdogan has retained the backing of conservative voters who remain devoted to him for lifting Islam’s profile in the Turkey, which was founded on secular principles, and for raising the country’s influence in world politics.

If he wins, Erdogan, 69, could remain in power until 2028. A devout Muslim, he heads the conservative and religious Justice and Development Party, or AKP. Erdogan transformed the presidency from a largely ceremonial role to a powerful office through a narrowly won 2017 referendum that scrapped Turkey’s parliamentary system of governance. He was the first directly elected president in 2014, and won the 2018 election that ushered in the executive presidency.

The first half of Erdogan’s tenure included reforms that allowed the country to begin talks to join the European Union, and economic growth that lifted many out of poverty. But he later moved to suppress freedoms and the media and concentrated more power in his own hands, especially after a failed coup attempt that Turkey says was orchestrated by the U.S.-based Islamic cleric Fethullah Gulen. The cleric denies involvement.

Erdogan’s rival is a soft-mannered former civil servant who has led the pro-secular Republican People’s Party, or CHP, since 2010. Kilicdaroglu campaigned on promises to reverse Erdogan’s democratic backsliding, to restore the economy by reverting to more conventional policies, and to improve ties with the West.

In a frantic effort to reach out to nationalist voters in the runoff, Kilicdaroglu vowed to send back refugees and ruled out peace negotiations with Kurdish militants if he is elected.

A defeat for Kilicdaroglu would add to a long list of electoral losses to Erdogan, and put pressure on him to step down as party chairman.

Erdogan’s AKP party and its allies retained a majority of seats in parliament following a legislative election that was also held on May 14.

Erdogan’s party dominated in the earthquake-hit region, winning 10 out of 11 provinces in an area that has traditionally supported the president. Erdogan came in ahead in the first round presidential race in eight of those provinces.

Sunday also marks the 10th anniversary of the start of mass anti-government protests that broke out over plans to uproot trees in Istanbul’s Gezi Park, and became one of the most serious challenges to Erdogan’s government.

Erdogan’s response to the protests, in which eight people were convicted for alleged involvement, was a harbinger of a crackdown on civil society and freedom of expression.

Following the May 14 vote, international observers pointed to the criminalization of dissemination of false information and online censorship as evidence that Erdogan had an “unjustified advantage.” They also said that strong turnout showed the resilience of Turkish democracy.

Erdogan and pro-government media portrayed Kilicdaroglu, who received the backing of the country’s pro-Kurdish party, as colluding with “terrorists” and of supporting what they described as “deviant” LGBTQ rights.

Kilicdaroglu “receives his orders from Qandil,” Erdogan repeatedly said at recent campaign rallies, a reference to the mountains in Iraq where the leadership of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK, is based.

The election was held as the country marked the 100th anniversary of its establishment as a republic, following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire.

___

Zeynep Bilginsoy reported from Istanbul. Mucahit Ceylan contributed from Diyarbakir, Turkey and Cinar Kiper contributed from Bodrum, Turkey.

The post Polls close in Turkey as voters choose between Erdogan and Kilicdaroglu in presidential runoff appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
]]>
Polls close in Turkey as voters choose between Erdogan and Kilicdaroglu in presidential runoff https://kesq.com/news/ap-national-business/2023/05/28/polls-close-in-turkey-as-voters-choose-between-erdogan-and-kilicdaroglu-in-presidential-runoff/ Sun, 28 May 2023 14:22:07 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/polls-close-in-turkey-as-voters-choose-between-erdogan-and-kilicdaroglu-in-presidential-runoff/

By SUZAN FRASER and ZEYNEP BILGINSOY Associated Press ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey began counting ballots Sunday evening in a runoff presidential race that will decide whether the country’s longtime leader stretches his increasingly authoritarian rule into a third decade, or is unseated by a challenger who has promised to restore a more democratic society.

The post Polls close in Turkey as voters choose between Erdogan and Kilicdaroglu in presidential runoff appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

By SUZAN FRASER and ZEYNEP BILGINSOY
Associated Press

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey began counting ballots Sunday evening in a runoff presidential race that will decide whether the country’s longtime leader stretches his increasingly authoritarian rule into a third decade, or is unseated by a challenger who has promised to restore a more democratic society.

Turkey does not have exit polls, but preliminary results are expected within hours after polls closed at 5 p.m.

The final decision could have implications far beyond Ankara. Turkey stands at the crossroads of Europe and Asia, and it plays a key role in NATO.

Erdogan’s government vetoed Sweden’s bid to join NATO and purchased Russian missile-defense systems, which prompted the United States to oust Turkey from a U.S.-led fighter-jet project. But it also helped broker a crucial deal that allowed Ukrainian grain shipments and averted a global food crisis.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has been at Turkey’s helm for 20 years, was favored to win a new five-year term in the second-round runoff, after coming just short of outright victory in the first round on May 14.

The divisive populist finished four percentage points ahead of Kemal Kilicdaroglu, the candidate of a six-party alliance and leader of Turkey’s center-left main opposition party. Erdogan’s performance came despite crippling inflation and the effects of a devastating earthquake three months ago. It was the first time he didn’t win an election where he ran as a candidate.

The two candidates offered sharply different visions of the country’s future, and its recent past.

“This election took place under very difficult circumstances, there was all sorts of slander and defamation,” the 74-year-old Kilicdaroglu (pronounced KEH-lich-DAHR-OH-loo) told reporters after casting his ballot. “But I trust in the common sense of the people. Democracy will come, freedom will come, people will be able to wander the streets and freely criticize politicians.”

Speaking to reporters after casting his vote at a school in Istanbul, Erdogan noted that it’s the first presidential runoff election in Turkey’s history. He also praised high voter turnout in the first round and said he expected participation to be high again on Sunday. He voted at the same time as Kilicdaroglu, as local television showed the rivals casting ballots on split screens.

“I pray to God, that it (the election) will be beneficial for our country and nation,” he said.

Critics blame Erdogan’s unconventional economic policies for skyrocketing inflation that has fueled a cost-of-living crisis. Many also faulted his government for a slow response to the earthquake that killed more than 50,000 people in Turkey.

In the mainly Kurdish-populated province of Diyarbakir — one of 11 regions that was hit by the Feb. 6 earthquake — 60-year-old retiree Mustafa Yesil said he voted for “change.”

“I’m not happy at all with the way this country is going. Let me be clear, if this current administration continues, I don’t see good things for the future,” he said. “I see that it will end badly — this administration has to change.”

Mehmet Yurttas, an Erdogan supporter, disagreed.

“I believe that our homeland is at the peak, in a very good condition,” the 57-year-old shop owner said. “Our country’s trajectory is very good and it will continue being good.”

Erdogan has retained the backing of conservative voters who remain devoted to him for lifting Islam’s profile in the Turkey, which was founded on secular principles, and for raising the country’s influence in world politics.

If he wins, Erdogan, 69, could remain in power until 2028. A devout Muslim, he heads the conservative and religious Justice and Development Party, or AKP. Erdogan transformed the presidency from a largely ceremonial role to a powerful office through a narrowly won 2017 referendum that scrapped Turkey’s parliamentary system of governance. He was the first directly elected president in 2014, and won the 2018 election that ushered in the executive presidency.

The first half of Erdogan’s tenure included reforms that allowed the country to begin talks to join the European Union, and economic growth that lifted many out of poverty. But he later moved to suppress freedoms and the media and concentrated more power in his own hands, especially after a failed coup attempt that Turkey says was orchestrated by the U.S.-based Islamic cleric Fethullah Gulen. The cleric denies involvement.

Erdogan’s rival is a soft-mannered former civil servant who has led the pro-secular Republican People’s Party, or CHP, since 2010. Kilicdaroglu campaigned on promises to reverse Erdogan’s democratic backsliding, to restore the economy by reverting to more conventional policies, and to improve ties with the West.

In a frantic effort to reach out to nationalist voters in the runoff, Kilicdaroglu vowed to send back refugees and ruled out peace negotiations with Kurdish militants if he is elected.

A defeat for Kilicdaroglu would add to a long list of electoral losses to Erdogan, and put pressure on him to step down as party chairman.

Erdogan’s AKP party and its allies retained a majority of seats in parliament following a legislative election that was also held on May 14.

Erdogan’s party dominated in the earthquake-hit region, winning 10 out of 11 provinces in an area that has traditionally supported the president. Erdogan came in ahead in the first round presidential race in eight of those provinces.

Sunday also marks the 10th anniversary of the start of mass anti-government protests that broke out over plans to uproot trees in Istanbul’s Gezi Park, and became one of the most serious challenges to Erdogan’s government.

Erdogan’s response to the protests, in which eight people were convicted for alleged involvement, was a harbinger of a crackdown on civil society and freedom of expression.

Following the May 14 vote, international observers pointed to the criminalization of dissemination of false information and online censorship as evidence that Erdogan had an “unjustified advantage.” They also said that strong turnout showed the resilience of Turkish democracy.

Erdogan and pro-government media portrayed Kilicdaroglu, who received the backing of the country’s pro-Kurdish party, as colluding with “terrorists” and of supporting what they described as “deviant” LGBTQ rights.

Kilicdaroglu “receives his orders from Qandil,” Erdogan repeatedly said at recent campaign rallies, a reference to the mountains in Iraq where the leadership of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK, is based.

The election was held as the country marked the 100th anniversary of its establishment as a republic, following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire.

___

Zeynep Bilginsoy reported from Istanbul. Mucahit Ceylan contributed from Diyarbakir, Turkey and Cinar Kiper contributed from Bodrum, Turkey.

The post Polls close in Turkey as voters choose between Erdogan and Kilicdaroglu in presidential runoff appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
]]>
Chris Sununu will decide on 2024 presidential bid ‘in the next week or two’ https://kesq.com/news/national-politics/cnn-us-politics/2023/05/28/chris-sununu-will-decide-on-2024-presidential-bid-in-the-next-week-or-two/ https://kesq.com/news/national-politics/cnn-us-politics/2023/05/28/chris-sununu-will-decide-on-2024-presidential-bid-in-the-next-week-or-two/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 14:19:20 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/chris-sununu-will-decide-on-2024-presidential-bid-in-the-next-week-or-two/ New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu takes part in a GOP panel discussion in Orlando

By Shawna Mizelle, CNN Washington (CNN) — New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu will decide “in the next week or two” if he wants to mount a bid for the 2024 Republican presidential nomination. “When I start doing something, I’m 120% in,” the governor told CNN’s Jake Tapper on “State of the Union” on Sunday. “Pretty

The post Chris Sununu will decide on 2024 presidential bid ‘in the next week or two’ appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu takes part in a GOP panel discussion in Orlando

By Shawna Mizelle, CNN

Washington (CNN) — New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu will decide “in the next week or two” if he wants to mount a bid for the 2024 Republican presidential nomination.

“When I start doing something, I’m 120% in,” the governor told CNN’s Jake Tapper on “State of the Union” on Sunday. “Pretty soon, we’ll make a decision, probably in the next week or two. And we’ll either be go or no-go.”

Sununu’s remarks come as the field of GOP presidential hopefuls continues to widen, following the entrance of Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott into the race last week.

Sununu, currently in his fourth term as New Hampshire governor, said figuring out where he could be most effective would factor into his 2024 decision.

“The money has been lined up, the support’s been lined up. There’s a pathway to win. All that – those boxes are checked. The family’s on board, which is always a big one. I just got to make sure it’s right for the party and right for me,” he said.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Chris Sununu will decide on 2024 presidential bid ‘in the next week or two’ appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/news/national-politics/cnn-us-politics/2023/05/28/chris-sununu-will-decide-on-2024-presidential-bid-in-the-next-week-or-two/feed/ 0 ]]>
Biden and GOP reach debt-ceiling deal. Now Congress must approve it to prevent calamitous default https://kesq.com/news/ap-national-business/2023/05/28/biden-and-gop-reach-debt-ceiling-deal-now-congress-must-approve-it-to-prevent-calamitous-default/ Sun, 28 May 2023 14:13:26 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/biden-and-gop-reach-debt-ceiling-deal-now-congress-must-approve-it-to-prevent-calamitous-default/

By LISA MASCARO, MARY CLARE JALONICK, ZEKE MILLER and KEVIN FREKING Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — An “agreement in principle” between President Joe Biden and House Speaker Kevin McCarthy would raise the nation’s legal debt ceiling, but now Congress has only days to approve a package that includes spending cuts and would avert a potentially

The post Biden and GOP reach debt-ceiling deal. Now Congress must approve it to prevent calamitous default appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

By LISA MASCARO, MARY CLARE JALONICK, ZEKE MILLER and KEVIN FREKING
Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — An “agreement in principle” between President Joe Biden and House Speaker Kevin McCarthy would raise the nation’s legal debt ceiling, but now Congress has only days to approve a package that includes spending cuts and would avert a potentially disastrous U.S. default. The compromise announced late Saturday risks angering both Democratic and Republican lawmakers as they begin to unpack the concessions. Support from both parties will be needed to win congressional approval before a projected June 5 government default on U.S. debts. McCarthy told reporters Sunday that the agreement “doesn’t get everything everybody wanted,” but that’s to be expected in a divided government.

The post Biden and GOP reach debt-ceiling deal. Now Congress must approve it to prevent calamitous default appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
]]>
Biden and GOP reach debt-ceiling deal. Now Congress must approve it to prevent calamitous default https://kesq.com/news/ap-national-news/2023/05/28/biden-and-gop-reach-debt-ceiling-deal-now-congress-must-approve-it-to-prevent-calamitous-default-2/ Sun, 28 May 2023 14:13:26 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/biden-and-gop-reach-debt-ceiling-deal-now-congress-must-approve-it-to-prevent-calamitous-default-2/

By LISA MASCARO, MARY CLARE JALONICK, ZEKE MILLER and KEVIN FREKING Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — An “agreement in principle” between President Joe Biden and House Speaker Kevin McCarthy would raise the nation’s legal debt ceiling, but now Congress has only days to approve a package that includes spending cuts and would avert a potentially

The post Biden and GOP reach debt-ceiling deal. Now Congress must approve it to prevent calamitous default appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

By LISA MASCARO, MARY CLARE JALONICK, ZEKE MILLER and KEVIN FREKING
Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — An “agreement in principle” between President Joe Biden and House Speaker Kevin McCarthy would raise the nation’s legal debt ceiling, but now Congress has only days to approve a package that includes spending cuts and would avert a potentially disastrous U.S. default. The compromise announced late Saturday risks angering both Democratic and Republican lawmakers as they begin to unpack the concessions. Support from both parties will be needed to win congressional approval before a projected June 5 government default on U.S. debts. Lawmakers aren’t expected to return to work from the Memorial Day weekend before Tuesday, at the earliest. White House officials plan to brief House Democrats Sunday.

The post Biden and GOP reach debt-ceiling deal. Now Congress must approve it to prevent calamitous default appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
]]>
Detienen a padres tras encontrar a sus 7 hijos viviendo en una casa con ratas enjauladas y refrigerador cerrado con candado, dice la policía https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/detienen-a-padres-tras-encontrar-a-sus-7-hijos-viviendo-en-una-casa-con-ratas-enjauladas-y-refrigerador-cerrado-con-candado-dice-la-policia/ https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/detienen-a-padres-tras-encontrar-a-sus-7-hijos-viviendo-en-una-casa-con-ratas-enjauladas-y-refrigerador-cerrado-con-candado-dice-la-policia/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 14:12:21 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/detienen-a-padres-tras-encontrar-a-sus-7-hijos-viviendo-en-una-casa-con-ratas-enjauladas-y-refrigerador-cerrado-con-candado-dice-la-policia/ Rocío Muñoz-Ledo (CNN) — La policía de Pensilvania detuvo a dos padres tras encontrar a sus siete hijos viviendo en lo que las autoridades describieron como “condiciones de vida insalubres” e “inseguras”, que incluían ratas enjauladas y heces en el suelo de la casa. Según una declaración jurada de la policía presentada el 19 de

The post Detienen a padres tras encontrar a sus 7 hijos viviendo en una casa con ratas enjauladas y refrigerador cerrado con candado, dice la policía appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
Rocío Muñoz-Ledo

(CNN) — La policía de Pensilvania detuvo a dos padres tras encontrar a sus siete hijos viviendo en lo que las autoridades describieron como “condiciones de vida insalubres” e “inseguras”, que incluían ratas enjauladas y heces en el suelo de la casa.

Según una declaración jurada de la policía presentada el 19 de mayo, las autoridades respondieron el 23 de abril a un aviso de que tres niños entraron en una caravana abandonada en West Rockhill Township, a 65 km al norte de Filadelfia.

Una mujer se declaró culpable del asesinato en 1990 de una madre de Florida vestida de payaso, pero aún niega que cometió el crimen

Cuando la policía encontró a los niños, habló con los padres y los devolvió a su casa, junto a la caravana abandonada.

Allí, los agentes observaron “condiciones de vida deplorables” y un refrigerador asegurado con un candado, según las autoridades.

La madre, Crystal Robertson, dijo a la policía que había tenido que cerrar la nevera con candado porque los niños estaban “‘robando’ todo y se refirió a los niños como ‘trituradores de basura con patas'”, según la declaración jurada.

Los padres se enfrentan a cargos por delitos graves, según la policía

Cuando los agentes regresaron más tarde a la casa después de presentar un informe ante la Agencia de Servicios Sociales para Niños y Jóvenes del condado de Bucks, descubrieron a cuatro niños más en el interior.

Una de las habitaciones tenía aproximadamente dos docenas de ratas en jaulas, según la declaración jurada. Se encontraron heces en el suelo en otra zona de la casa.

“También había mal olor… y varios bichos”, decía la declaración jurada. Se observó que “dos perros, dos tortugas, dos conejos, serpientes, sapos y un reptil de cuatro pies” también estaban en la casa, decía la declaración jurada.

Los niños fueron puestos bajo custodia protectora y trasladados a un hospital para recibir tratamiento médico.

Una investigación posterior reveló que ninguno de los siete niños había asistido a la escuela y carecían de conocimientos básicos, según las autoridades. También mostraban ansiedad social, según la policía.

Mueren 2 niños tras ser arrastrados por un río del centro de California durante unas condiciones peligrosas

Las autoridades señalaron que las evaluaciones médicas concluyeron que los niños estaban “clínicamente de bajo peso y desnutridos”.

“La higiene personal de los niños también era preocupante, por lo que dos de los niños tuvieron que afeitarse el pelo debido a que estaban muy enmarañados”, según un comunicado de prensa del Departamento de Policía Regional de Pennridge.

El padre, Shane William Robertson, y la madre fueron acusados de siete delitos graves cada uno por poner en peligro el bienestar de los niños, según el comunicado. Ambos pagaron el 10% requerido de la fianza de US$ 10.000, según la policía.

CNN no pudo ponerse en contacto con ninguno de los padres este sábado y se desconoce si tienen representación legal.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Detienen a padres tras encontrar a sus 7 hijos viviendo en una casa con ratas enjauladas y refrigerador cerrado con candado, dice la policía appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/detienen-a-padres-tras-encontrar-a-sus-7-hijos-viviendo-en-una-casa-con-ratas-enjauladas-y-refrigerador-cerrado-con-candado-dice-la-policia/feed/ 0 ]]>
What’s next on the debt ceiling: Selling the plan and making a deal into a law https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/whats-next-on-the-debt-ceiling-selling-the-plan-and-making-a-deal-into-a-law-2/ Sun, 28 May 2023 14:07:03 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/whats-next-on-the-debt-ceiling-selling-the-plan-and-making-a-deal-into-a-law-2/

By MARY CLARE JALONICK and KEVIN FREKING Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — After weeks of negotiations, President Joe Biden and House Speaker Kevin McCarthy have announced an “ agreement in principle ” to raise the nation’s debt ceiling and avoid a potentially catastrophic default. The agreement includes spending cuts demanded by Republicans, but it is

The post What’s next on the debt ceiling: Selling the plan and making a deal into a law appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

By MARY CLARE JALONICK and KEVIN FREKING
Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — After weeks of negotiations, President Joe Biden and House Speaker Kevin McCarthy have announced an “ agreement in principle ” to raise the nation’s debt ceiling and avoid a potentially catastrophic default.

The agreement includes spending cuts demanded by Republicans, but it is short of the reductions in the sweeping legislation passed by the Republican-led House last month.

To reduce spending, as Republicans had insisted, the package includes a two-year budget deal that would hold spending flat for 2024 and impose limits for 2025. That’s in exchange for raising the debt limit for two years, until after the next election.

It also expands some work requirements for food-stamp recipients and tweaks an environmental law to try to streamline reviews to build new energy projects.

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen has said the United States could default on its debt obligations by June 5 if lawmakers do not act in time to raise the federal debt ceiling.

A look at what’s next as Congress rushes to pass an agreement:

FINALIZING THE DEAL

Speaking to reporters in the Capitol late Saturday, McCarthy said the bill has “historic reductions in spending, consequential reforms that will lift people out of poverty into the workforce and rein in government overreach. There are no new taxes and no new government programs.”

Still, he said, “we still have more work to do tonight to finish all the writing of it.” The speaker and his lead negotiators were still holed up in his office as midnight approached.

McCarthy said he would speak to Biden again on Sunday. House Minority Leader Hakeem Jeffries of New York said in a letter to Democratic colleagues that Biden and McCarthy planned to speak by no later than 2 p.m. to complete the agreement and that Biden administration officials would brief House Democrats on the agreement at 5 p.m.

Biden said in a statement that “over the next day, our negotiating teams will finalize legislative text and the agreement will go to the United States House and Senate. I strongly urge both chambers to pass the agreement right away.”

The agreement is “an important step forward that reduces spending while protecting critical programs for working people and growing the economy for everyone,” Biden said.

SELLING THE BILL

To pass the bill, both McCarthy and Biden will now have to sell it to their respective parties. While both sides are expected to lose some votes, they have to make sure that the deal is popular enough to pass both chambers without a revolt on either side.

McCarthy held a call Saturday evening with the Republican caucus, fulfilling a promise he made to show the agreement to them before revealing the legislation to the public. He said he expects to release the text of the bill publicly Sunday afternoon.

McCarthy said in an interview on “Fox News Sunday” that the bill is less than 150 pages and the House would wait 72 hours before voting on it so it can be publicly reviewed. “This is worthy of the American people. I want them to read it. I want them to understand it,” he said.

The Republican speaker said called it “a good bill for the American public” and said he expects a majority of Republicans to vote for it and a lot of Democrats as well because Biden was on board. But he said that “right now, the Democrats are very upset” and that Jeffries told him “There’s not one thing in the bill for Democrats.”

Reaction was mixed. Rep. Dan Bishop of North Carolina tweeted a vomit emoji, complaining that some Republicans on the call were praising the speaker for getting what he said is “almost zippo in exchange” for the debt ceiling hike.

South Dakota Rep. Dusty Johnson, an ally of McCarthy, said people he was talking to are “incredibly supportive” of the deal, though he acknowledged they will lose some votes.

White House officials will give their own briefing to House Democrats on Sunday at 5 p.m., according to a House Democratic aide.

CONGRESS RETURNS

Both the House and Senate are expected to return on Tuesday, after Memorial Day. McCarthy said the House will vote Wednesday, which would then send the bill to the Senate.

Once the bill reaches the Senate, where Democrats have the majority, the pace of action will largely depend on whether any senators try to hold up the bill, possibly with amendment votes. That could tie up the legislation for a few days.

Still, the Senate can move quickly when they have agreement from all 100 senators. The bill could be passed by the end of the week, with a quick Biden signature to make it law.

If all goes according to McCarthy’s plan — and both chambers are able to pass the legislation — the potential crisis should be resolved by June 5, which is when the Treasury Department projects the U.S. would be at risk of default.

“This agreement is good news for the American people, because it prevents what could have been a catastrophic default and would have led to an economic recession, retirement accounts devastated, and millions of jobs lost,” Biden said in his Saturday evening statement.

___

Associated Press writers Lisa Mascaro, Seung Min Kim, Zeke Miller in Washington and Michelle L. Price in New York contributed to this report.

The post What’s next on the debt ceiling: Selling the plan and making a deal into a law appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
]]>
State Farm stops home insurance sales in California, citing wildfire risks https://kesq.com/money/cnn-business-consumer/2023/05/28/state-farm-stops-home-insurance-sales-in-california-citing-wildfire-risks/ https://kesq.com/money/cnn-business-consumer/2023/05/28/state-farm-stops-home-insurance-sales-in-california-citing-wildfire-risks/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 14:02:26 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/state-farm-stops-home-insurance-sales-in-california-citing-wildfire-risks/ By Ramishah Maruf, CNN New York (CNN) — State Farm is stopping new home insurance sales in California, citing wildfire risks and skyrocketing construction costs, the company announced Friday. The insurance giant stopped accepting applications for all business and personal lines property and casualty insurance in California on May 27. However, State Farm’s decision does

The post State Farm stops home insurance sales in California, citing wildfire risks appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
By Ramishah Maruf, CNN

New York (CNN) — State Farm is stopping new home insurance sales in California, citing wildfire risks and skyrocketing construction costs, the company announced Friday.

The insurance giant stopped accepting applications for all business and personal lines property and casualty insurance in California on May 27. However, State Farm’s decision does not affect existing auto insurance.

“State Farm General Insurance Company made this decision due to historic increases in construction costs outpacing inflation, rapidly growing catastrophe exposure, and a challenging reinsurance market,” the company said in a statement.

California has seen an average of more than 7,000 wildfires each year, consuming an average of over 2 million acres, over the past five years, according to data from the governor’s office. Scientists and California authorities blame the climate crisis for the intensity of the fire seasons.

State Farm, which is the largest provider of auto and home insurance in the US with its affiliates, claimed it would still work with the California Department of Insurance and lawmakers to build up market capacity in the state.

“However, it’s necessary to take these actions now to improve the company’s financial strength,” State Farm said, adding it will reevaluate according to market conditions.

The Illinois-based insurance group said its agents will continue to work with existing customers.

Last year, American Insurance Group said it would pull policies for multimillion-dollar homes in California, partly because of wildfire risk, the Wall Street Journal reported.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

CNN’s Brandon Miller and Cheri Mossburg contributed to this report.

The post State Farm stops home insurance sales in California, citing wildfire risks appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/money/cnn-business-consumer/2023/05/28/state-farm-stops-home-insurance-sales-in-california-citing-wildfire-risks/feed/ 0 ]]>
Ontario community battles to keep emergency department from closing for good https://kesq.com/cnn-regional/2023/05/28/ontario-community-battles-to-keep-emergency-department-from-closing-for-good/ https://kesq.com/cnn-regional/2023/05/28/ontario-community-battles-to-keep-emergency-department-from-closing-for-good/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 13:27:10 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/ontario-community-battles-to-keep-emergency-department-from-closing-for-good/ By Heather Butts Click here for updates on this story     Toronto (CTV Network) — The emergency department in Minden, Ont. is slated to close for good June 1, but residents in the town and surrounding area are prepared to head to court to try and save it. The announcement of the ER closure by Haliburton

The post Ontario community battles to keep emergency department from closing for good appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
By Heather Butts

Click here for updates on this story

    Toronto (CTV Network) — The emergency department in Minden, Ont. is slated to close for good June 1, but residents in the town and surrounding area are prepared to head to court to try and save it.

The announcement of the ER closure by Haliburton Highlands Health Service came April 20, just six weeks before the closure and right as the area begins to swells with summer residents.

“This is a plan that is going to cost lives,” said Patrick Porzuczek, a local businessman who is spearheading a campaign called Save the Minden ER.

His grassroots group has held rallies and gathered a petition with more than 24,000 signatures. They’ve also raised more than $75,000 to cover legal fees as they prepared to file a court injunction.

“We’re not numbers, we’re not part of a morbidity and mortality rate, we’re human lives, and this has to stop,” Porzuckek said.

Haliburton Highlands Health Services, which runs the hospital, said all services would be transferred and consolidated at its Haliburton site, more than 20 minutes away from Minden.

“Staffing shortages is the biggest driver for this, without doctors and nurses we can’t run an emergency department,” said Carolyn Plummer, president and CEO of Haliburton Highlands Health Service, adding, “We were facing multiple frequent closures over the coming months if we didn’t do something.”

A critical shortage of nurses and physicians has sent a ripple effect across the country. Temporary ER closures have become routine practice in dozens of rural communities, shuttered for hours or days at a time.

“We can’t be doing this on an ad-hoc basis nationally, this is a national problem with common root causes that needs national discussion, a national dialogue, a national approach,” said Dr. Alan Drummond, an emergency room physician and co-chair of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians. “I think the way to go, is to sort of define rural Canadians what is a reasonable expectation and how we might best serve their needs in terms of reasonable access to quality care.”

The Minden ER has never implemented a temporary closure and is the only emergency department in the country to close permanently in the last year.

Nova Scotia transitioned some of its rural ERs to urgent treatment centres (UTC) with reduced hours. These UTCs are often open eight or 12 hours per day, four or five days per week.

“I think it would be worthy of consideration in the Minden situation to maybe trial the Nova Scotia model to see if it works,” said Dr. Drummond. “Because there’s going to be other communities facing this very same situation in the coming years and we need an approach—particularly in Ontario—and we need to know how to handle this.”

Residents in Minden have been calling on the local MPP Laurie Scott to step in and they have taken their pleas to Ontario’s Legislature.

In a statement to CTV National News, a spokesperson for the Minister of Health said: “Hospitals are independent corporations who are authorized to direct their own operations, including decisions respecting services that they provide and in what locations, the Ministry of Health is not involved in these decisions and to suggest so is false.”

Part of the public outcry has been for more transparency and communication with the community. The hospital says it launched a campaign last summer, encouraging people to call ahead to ensure the ER was open, but members of Save the Minden ER say there were no warning signs the emergency department could face a permanent closure this year.

“This came as a complete shock to the community, the doctors and nurses were told 15 minutes before announcement to the public,” said Porzuczek.

Doctors who work at the Minden site have stated their schedule was full for the summer months, until September.

Plummer told CTV National News it wasn’t entirely full: “there were still gaps in the schedule.”

When asked about the Haliburton staffing schedule and the risk of temporary closure there, she confirmed “the risk isn’t entirely gone, but this move that we’re making is doing a lot to mitigate that risk in a way we wouldn’t otherwise be able to do.”

Hospitals across Canada have tried to recruit staff from other provinces and other countries. Plummer says they have been working hard on recruitment for many years.

“We have tried recruiting internationally-trained health care professionals, unfortunately we haven’t had the same luck that others have had in attracting people here,” she said.

When asked about the future of the Minden site and if a UTC was considered, the hospital CEO said once the consolidation process is complete they will turn their attention to what services they’re going to provide there.

“We have certainly been hearing messages from people in our community about how people are using our emergency department services. We have a shortage of primary care physicians, a lot of people use it for primary care. That will be top of mind when we look at options for our Minden site,” Plummer told CTV News.

The grassroots campaign Save the Minden ER is hoping a court injunction will stop the process and they intend to keep fighting for health care services in that community beyond June 1.

Please note: This content carries a strict local market embargo. If you share the same market as the contributor of this article, you may not use it on any platform.

The post Ontario community battles to keep emergency department from closing for good appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/cnn-regional/2023/05/28/ontario-community-battles-to-keep-emergency-department-from-closing-for-good/feed/ 0 ]]>
Running through middle age can keep brain healthy and neurons wired: study https://kesq.com/cnn-regional/2023/05/28/running-through-middle-age-can-keep-brain-healthy-and-neurons-wired-study/ https://kesq.com/cnn-regional/2023/05/28/running-through-middle-age-can-keep-brain-healthy-and-neurons-wired-study/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 13:26:29 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/running-through-middle-age-can-keep-brain-healthy-and-neurons-wired-study/ By Daniel Otis Click here for updates on this story     Toronto (CTV Network) — Exercising as you age can help maintain memory and fight cognitive decline, according to a new study. In the study, researcher’s from Florida Atlantic University and Mexico’s National Polytechnic Institute looked at the long-term effects of running on the brains of

The post Running through middle age can keep brain healthy and neurons wired: study appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
By Daniel Otis

Click here for updates on this story

    Toronto (CTV Network) — Exercising as you age can help maintain memory and fight cognitive decline, according to a new study.

In the study, researcher’s from Florida Atlantic University and Mexico’s National Polytechnic Institute looked at the long-term effects of running on the brains of mice. They found middle-aged rodents with access to a running wheel did a better job of maintaining the wiring of older neurons linked to memory.

“Our study provides insight as to how chronic exercise, beginning in young adulthood and continuing throughout middle age, helps maintain memory function during aging, emphasizing the relevance of including exercise in our daily lives,” study co-author and National Polytechnic Institute researcher Carmen Vivar said in a news release.

The researchers focused on neurons formed during early adulthood that were connected to the hippocampus, a part of the brain associated with learning and memory. The hippocampus and connections with adjacent parts of the brain are among the first structures affected by aging-related cognitive decline, which can be delayed or prevented in part through exercise, according to the study.

“Long-term running may enhance pattern separation ability, our ability to distinguish between highly similar events and stimuli, a behaviour closely linked to adult neurogenesis, which is among the first to display deficits indicative of age-related memory decline,” Vivar said.

The study also showed long-term running can increase the number of adult-born neurons, which are important cells that send signals within our brains and bodies.

“Long-term exercise profoundly benefits the aging brain and may prevent aging-related memory function decline by increasing the survival and modifying the network of the adult-born neurons born during early adulthood, and thereby facilitating their participation in cognitive processes,” co-author and Florida Atlantic University associate professor of biomedical science Henriette van Praag explained in the news release.

The study was published this month in the peer-reviewed academic journal eNeuro.

Please note: This content carries a strict local market embargo. If you share the same market as the contributor of this article, you may not use it on any platform.

CTVNews.caProducers@bellmedia.ca

The post Running through middle age can keep brain healthy and neurons wired: study appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/cnn-regional/2023/05/28/running-through-middle-age-can-keep-brain-healthy-and-neurons-wired-study/feed/ 0 ]]>
Jan. 6 rioters are raking in thousands in donations. Now the US is coming after their haul https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/jan-6-rioters-are-raking-in-thousands-in-donations-now-the-us-is-coming-after-their-haul/ Sun, 28 May 2023 13:14:36 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/jan-6-rioters-are-raking-in-thousands-in-donations-now-the-us-is-coming-after-their-haul/

By MICHAEL KUNZELMAN Associated Press Less than two months after he pleaded guilty to storming the U.S. Capitol, Texas resident Daniel Goodwyn appeared on Tucker Carlson’s then-Fox News show and promoted a website where supporters could donate money to Goodwyn and other rioters whom the site called “political prisoners.” The Justice Department now wants Goodwyn

The post Jan. 6 rioters are raking in thousands in donations. Now the US is coming after their haul appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

By MICHAEL KUNZELMAN
Associated Press

Less than two months after he pleaded guilty to storming the U.S. Capitol, Texas resident Daniel Goodwyn appeared on Tucker Carlson’s then-Fox News show and promoted a website where supporters could donate money to Goodwyn and other rioters whom the site called “political prisoners.”

The Justice Department now wants Goodwyn to give up more than $25,000 he raised — a clawback that is part of a growing effort by the government to prevent rioters from being able to personally profit from participating in the attack that shook the foundations of American democracy.

An Associated Press review of court records shows that prosecutors in the more than 1,000 criminal cases from Jan. 6, 2021, are increasingly asking judges to impose fines on top of prison sentences to offset donations from supporters of the Capitol rioters.

Dozens of defendants have set up online fundraising appeals for help with legal fees, and prosecutors acknowledge there’s nothing wrong with asking for help for attorney expenses. But the Justice Department has, in some cases, questioned where the money is really going because many of those charged have had government-funded legal representation.

Most of the fundraising efforts appear on GiveSendGo, which bills itself as “The #1 Free Christian Fundraising Site” and has become a haven for Jan. 6 defendants barred from using mainstream crowdfunding sites, including GoFundMe, to raise money. The rioters often proclaim their innocence and portray themselves as victims of government oppression, even as they cut deals to plead guilty and cooperate with prosecutors.

Their fundraising success suggests that many people in the United States still view Jan. 6 rioters as patriots and cling to the baseless belief that Democrats stole the 2020 presidential election from Donald Trump. The former president himself has fueled that idea, pledging to pardon rioters if he is elected.

Markus Maly, a Virginia man scheduled to be sentenced next month for assaulting police at the Capitol, raised more than $16,000 from an online campaign that described him as a “January 6 P.O.W.” and asked for money for his family. Prosecutors have requested a $16,000-plus fine, noting that Maly had a public defender and did not owe any legal fees.

“He should not be able to use his own notoriety gained in the commission of his crimes to ‘capitalize’ on his participation in the Capitol breach in this way,” a prosecutor wrote in court papers.

So far this year, prosecutors have sought more than $390,000 in fines against at least 21 riot defendants, in amounts ranging from $450 to more than $71,000, according to the AP’s tally.

Judges have imposed at least $124,127 in fines against 33 riot defendants this year. In the previous two years, judges ordered more than 100 riot defendants to collectively pay more than $240,000 in fines.

Separately, judges have ordered hundreds of convicted rioters to pay more than $524,000 in restitution to the government to cover more than $2.8 million in damage to the Capitol and other Jan. 6-related expenses.

More rioters facing the most serious charges and longest prison terms are now being sentenced. They tend to also be the prolific fundraisers, which could help explain the recent surge in fines requests.

Earlier this month, the judge who sentenced Nathaniel DeGrave to more than three years in prison also ordered him to pay a $25,000 fine. Prosecutors noted that the Nevada resident “incredibly” raised over $120,000 in GiveSendGo fundraising campaigns that referred to him as “Beijing Biden’s political prisoner” in “America’s Gitmo” — a reference to the Guantanamo Bay detention center.

“He did this despite seeking to cooperate with the government and admitting he and his co-conspirators were guilty since at least November 2021,” a prosecutor wrote.

Lawyer William Shipley, who has represented DeGrave and more than two dozen other Jan. 6 defendants, said he advises clients to avoid raising money under the auspices of being a political prisoner if they intend to plead guilty.

“Until they admit they committed a crime, they’re perfectly entitled to shout from the rooftops that the only reason they’re being held is because of politics,” Shipley said. “It’s just First Amendment political speech.”

Shipley said he provided the judge with documentation showing that DeGrave raised approximately $25,000 more than what he paid his lawyers.

“I’ve never had to do it until these cases because I’ve never had clients that had third-party fundraising like this,” Shipley said. “There’s a segment of the population that is sympathetic toward the plight of these defendants.”

GiveSendGo co-founder Heather Wilson said her site’s decision to allow legal defense funds for Capitol riot defendants “is rooted in our society’s commitment to the presumption of innocence and the freedom for all individuals to hire private attorneys.”

The government’s push for more fines comes as it reaches a milestone in the largest federal investigation in American history: Just over 500 defendants have been sentenced for Jan. 6 crimes.

Judges aren’t rubber-stamping prosecutors’ fine requests.

Prosecutors sought a more than $70,000 fine for Peter Schwartz, a Kentucky man who attacked police officers outside the Capitol with pepper spray and a chair. U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta sentenced Schwartz this month to more than 14 years in prison — one of the longest so far in a Capitol riot case — but didn’t impose a fine.

Prosecutors suspect Schwartz tried to profit from his fundraising campaign, “Patriot Pete Political Prisoner in DC.” But his lawyer, Dennis Boyle, said there is no evidence of that.

The judge “basically said that if the money was being used for attorneys’ fees or other costs like that, there was no basis for a fine,” Boyle said.

A jury convicted romance novel cover model John Strand of storming the Capitol with Dr. Simone Gold, a California physician who is a leading figure in the anti-vaccine movement. Now prosecutors are seeking a $50,000 fine on top of a prison term for Strand when a judge sentences him on Thursday.

Strand has raised more than $17,300 for his legal defense without disclosing that he has a taxpayer-funded lawyer, according to prosecutors. They say Strand appears to have “substantial financial means,” living in a home that was purchased for more than $3 million last year.

“Strand has raised, and continues to raise, money on his website based upon his false statements and misrepresentations on the events of January 6,” prosecutors wrote.

Goodwyn, who appeared on Carlson’s show in March, is scheduled to be sentenced next month. Defense lawyer Carolyn Stewart described prosecutors as “demanding blood from a stone” in asking for the $25,000 fine.

“He received that amount in charity to help him in his debt for legal fees for former attorneys and this for unknown reasons is bothersome to the government,” Stewart wrote.

___

Associated Press writer Alanna Durkin Richer in Boston contributed to this report.

___

This story has been corrected to reflect that the sentence for Peter Schwartz was one of the longest so far in a Capitol riot case, not the longest.

The post Jan. 6 rioters are raking in thousands in donations. Now the US is coming after their haul appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
]]>
7-vehicle crash kills 1, injures 2 near Indianapolis https://kesq.com/news/national-world/cnn-national/2023/05/28/7-vehicle-crash-kills-1-injures-2-near-indianapolis/ https://kesq.com/news/national-world/cnn-national/2023/05/28/7-vehicle-crash-kills-1-injures-2-near-indianapolis/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 13:05:42 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/7-vehicle-crash-kills-1-injures-2-near-indianapolis/ By Melissa Alonso, CNN (CNN) — One person is dead and two are hospitalized after a seven-vehicle crash just outside of Indianapolis shut down part of a freeway and left one car overturned and engulfed in flames, police say. The Saturday afternoon crash involved three semi-tractor trailers and four cars on Interstate 70, near the

The post 7-vehicle crash kills 1, injures 2 near Indianapolis appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
By Melissa Alonso, CNN

(CNN) — One person is dead and two are hospitalized after a seven-vehicle crash just outside of Indianapolis shut down part of a freeway and left one car overturned and engulfed in flames, police say.

The Saturday afternoon crash involved three semi-tractor trailers and four cars on Interstate 70, near the town of Plainfield, according to Indiana State Police.

Traffic on the interstate was initially backed up due to a minor crash, police said in a news release.

“As traffic backed up, the driver of a semi-tractor trailer failed to stop in time and hit the back of stopped traffic. Two vehicles rolled over and several other vehicles received heavy damage,” the release said.

Emergency responders arrived at the scene where several vehicles were severely damaged, “one of which was upside down and fully engulfed in flames,” according to police.

As the Plainfield Fire Department crews “hastily extinguished the flames, they located the driver who was entrapped in the wreckage” and died at the scene, police said.

First responders also found two people who were taken to a hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

The crash shut down the eastbound lanes of the interstate for nearly six hours while responders investigated and removed the wreckage, police said.

Authorities are still investigating the crash and do not believe alcohol or drugs were contributing factors.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

CNN’s Lauren Mascarenhas contributed to this report.

The post 7-vehicle crash kills 1, injures 2 near Indianapolis appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/news/national-world/cnn-national/2023/05/28/7-vehicle-crash-kills-1-injures-2-near-indianapolis/feed/ 0 ]]>
Summer is back, and so is this nostalgic beauty staple https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/summer-is-back-and-so-is-this-nostalgic-beauty-staple/ https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/summer-is-back-and-so-is-this-nostalgic-beauty-staple/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 13:03:16 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/summer-is-back-and-so-is-this-nostalgic-beauty-staple/ By AJ Willingham, CNN (CNN) — What does summer smell like? If you were a teen girl at any point over the last 50 years, there’s a good chance that, among the coconut tanning oil and leather car seats, your memory detects something else. A whiff of peroxide, perhaps. A top note of lemon. Summer

The post Summer is back, and so is this nostalgic beauty staple appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
By AJ Willingham, CNN

(CNN) — What does summer smell like? If you were a teen girl at any point over the last 50 years, there’s a good chance that, among the coconut tanning oil and leather car seats, your memory detects something else.

A whiff of peroxide, perhaps. A top note of lemon.

Summer is the season of Sun-In, a hair lightening spray that’s been birthing beach blondes (and beach oranges) for decades. Some may be surprised to know it’s still on shelves at all. So much has changed, and yet the lemon-peroxide elixir captures the timeless allure of DIY beauty treatments – and the endless, sunny optimism that keeps us trying them again and again.

A brief history of hair lightening

The desire for lighter, brighter hair has plagued virtually every culture in history at some point. Ancient Roman and Egyptians used everything from wine to bird droppings to gild their tresses. Women in Medieval Europe turned to eggs or even animal organs. (Those who could afford it, and who didn’t want to go through the trouble of smearing offal on their scalps, just donned wigs instead.) In the golden age of Hollywood, starlets sometimes risked becoming high school science experiments by heaping ammonia and bleach on their heads.

In fact, precursors to modern bleaching processes didn’t come on the scene until the turn of the 20th century, leaving our foremothers and forefathers plenty of time to get creative with their blonde pursuits. Lemon and peroxide, the two lightening ingredients in Sun-In, are more natural, less combustible options that have their own long histories in the annals of beauty.

“Ingredients like lemon juice and peroxide work together by stripping individual hair strands of their natural pigment,” says Brandi Jacobs, a hair stylist and cosmetologist in Atlanta. “The problem is, once that initial pigment is gone, darker hair has to go through several phases of orange and yellow tints before it is stripped enough to appear blonde. It’s a very unreliable process that’s different for everyone, especially if you’re using ingredients that aren’t specifically formulated for the hair.”

How Sun-In became a summer staple

Sun-In first became popular in the 1970s, capturing the imagination with bright ads featuring effortlessly sunkissed models cavorting on the beach or standing, just so, in a flattering ray of sunshine. As with all effectively marketed beauty products, Sun-In didn’t just promise lighter hair: It promised a perfect summer.

“Just spray Sun-In under the sun, and see what happens,” a 1971 ad from Glamour Magazine reads. “To your hair, maybe even your life.”

By the late ’80s, Sun-In was a summer go-to. (“Put sun in your hair!” a 1989 ad croons.) Other hair lightening sprays have come and gone, like Clairol’s Lemon Go Lightly, but Sun-In occupies a singular place in people’s hair memories. It’s still on shelves today, manufactured by an unassuming company called Chattem, Inc. that makes other drugstore icons like IcyHot, Gold Bond and Selsun Blue. Though the design of that bright yellow bottle has changed over the years, the wave of nostalgia it triggers still feels the same.

“Oh, Sun-In brings back so many memories,” says Kerry Hardaway, a server in Baltimore. “Like most young teens in the late ’90s I wasn’t allowed to dye my hair, but I thought, ‘Hey, I can buy something similar for a few dollars!’ Even my mom knew what it was.”

As seen in the intoxicating Sun-In ads of yore, Hardaway says it wasn’t just the promise of beachy locks that drew in her young self.

“Everyone wanted to make a big summer transformation,” she says. “Of course, we didn’t know what we were doing but it was fun.”

Fun, cheap, easy: It might as well be the trifecta of DIY beauty. But many who have fond memories of Sun-In summers also have less fond memories of dry, orangey strands that fell far short of the golden ideal.

“I honestly don’t know what we were thinking,” says Chelsea Locke, a 40-something mom from Alpharetta, Georgia. “It turned my brown hair nearly red, but I still kept using it, convinced it would eventually go blonde. I remember smelling it on the headrests of my mom’s car.”

Such are the pitfalls of doing things yourself (one has to think our ancient ancestors, with their guano hair masks, could relate).

Sun-In and similar products are still going strong

“I’ve been a hairdresser for almost 20 years, and I’ve seen almost everything people can put in their hair,” says Jacobs. “Yes, it’s true that stuff like Sun-In is the bane of our existence, but people still do it, and we’ll gladly help them correct it later.”

Even decades of trial and error hasn’t stopped Sun-In from trending every summer, and in recent years similar hair lightening products have hit the market, dressed up in chic pastel bottles and promising luxe results. Such alternatives pepper social media feeds, drawing in a new generation of young people to run the acrid gauntlet of blonde ambition. (Though, as some influencers and DIY hair devotees have pointed out, you don’t need to go blonde. Products like Sun-In can, theoretically, produce sunkissed results on all shades and types of hair.)

Videos about hair lightening spray have around 1.3 billion views on TikTok, with people of all ages spritzing more modern alternatives, like Sun Bum, Suntouched and Sunbabe Solar Hair Lightener. In this new lineup of summer potions, Sun-In is still the nostalgic classic.

Jacobs says, if it’s lightening your hair, the rest is just window dressing.

“The formulas are basically all the same,” she says.

Will we never learn? Probably not. We’ve had thousands of years to not put questionable stuff in our hair in pursuit of a shiny new look, and here we are, still frying our locks and vexing hair professionals. It just shows there’s some truth to all of those old Sun-In ads: It’s not just about the hair. It’s about the experience, too.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Summer is back, and so is this nostalgic beauty staple appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/summer-is-back-and-so-is-this-nostalgic-beauty-staple/feed/ 0 ]]>
Lionel Messi breaks Cristiano Ronaldo record as PSG wins historic Ligue 1 title https://kesq.com/sports/national-sports/cnn-sports/2023/05/28/lionel-messi-breaks-cristiano-ronaldo-record-as-psg-wins-historic-ligue-1-title/ https://kesq.com/sports/national-sports/cnn-sports/2023/05/28/lionel-messi-breaks-cristiano-ronaldo-record-as-psg-wins-historic-ligue-1-title/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 13:01:50 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/lionel-messi-breaks-cristiano-ronaldo-record-as-psg-wins-historic-ligue-1-title/ By Issy Ronald, CNN (CNN) — There was another landmark in the long rivalry between Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo on Saturday. As Paris Saint-Germain sealed an 11th Ligue 1 title, Messi scored his 496th goal in Europe’s top five leagues, surpassing Ronaldo’s previous record of 495 goals. The Argentine latched onto Kylian Mbappé’s perfectly

The post Lionel Messi breaks Cristiano Ronaldo record as PSG wins historic Ligue 1 title appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
By Issy Ronald, CNN

(CNN) — There was another landmark in the long rivalry between Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo on Saturday.

As Paris Saint-Germain sealed an 11th Ligue 1 title, Messi scored his 496th goal in Europe’s top five leagues, surpassing Ronaldo’s previous record of 495 goals.

The Argentine latched onto Kylian Mbappé’s perfectly weighted cross and found the back of the net to give PSG a 1-0 lead in the 59th minute against Strasbourg.

Kevin Gameiro equalized for Strasbourg twenty minutes later, but PSG still coasted to the league title despite the match ended in a draw.

It was a record-breaking day for PSG as well as Messi, as the club overtook Saint-Etienne’s haul of 10 Ligue 1 trophies to claim the outright record.

Victory also marked the first time in league history that PSG has sat at the top of the table from the first round of matches until the last, a run that stretches back to the third round of the 2021/22 season and 73 consecutive matches.

But this latest triumph masks an increasingly fractious relationship between PSG and Messi, who received a club-imposed suspension earlier this month for taking an unauthorized trip to Saudi Arabia, resulting in a missed training session.

The World Cup-winning forward has since apologized to PSG and his teammates, saying he “sincerely thought” that he had a free day. Some of his own fans booed him on his return to the side and, along with Neymar, he was also booed by a significant section of PSG fans in March.

Messi’s representatives rubbished rumors earlier this month that he has agreed to join a club in Saudi Arabia after his contract at PSG ends on June 30.

It has been a difficult season for manager Christophe Galtier, too, as PSG once again failed to make inroads in the Champions League after falling to Bayern Munich in the last 16.

“This afternoon I watched the last day of the season in the Bundesliga and you can see that it is very difficult to win the league, any league,” Galtier said afterwards, according to the BBC.

“The reigning champions in all European leagues have often had problems this season, so we appreciate what this means. It is a title and we must not believe it is normal to win, even if we are Paris Saint-Germain.”

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

CNN’s Aimee Lewis contributed to this report.

The post Lionel Messi breaks Cristiano Ronaldo record as PSG wins historic Ligue 1 title appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/sports/national-sports/cnn-sports/2023/05/28/lionel-messi-breaks-cristiano-ronaldo-record-as-psg-wins-historic-ligue-1-title/feed/ 0 ]]>
Start your week smart: Debt ceiling deal, Texas impeachment, Russian drone attack https://kesq.com/news/national-world/cnn-national/2023/05/28/start-your-week-smart-debt-ceiling-deal-texas-impeachment-russian-drone-attack-2/ https://kesq.com/news/national-world/cnn-national/2023/05/28/start-your-week-smart-debt-ceiling-deal-texas-impeachment-russian-drone-attack-2/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 12:55:04 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/start-your-week-smart-debt-ceiling-deal-texas-impeachment-russian-drone-attack-2/ CNN By Andrew Torgan and Daniel Wine, CNN (CNN) — We hope you are relaxing this Memorial Day weekend and enjoying your favorite outdoor activities. Wherever you are, don’t forget the sunscreen. Check out these tips on which types of sunscreen you should choose — and which types to avoid. Without further ado, here’s what

The post Start your week smart: Debt ceiling deal, Texas impeachment, Russian drone attack appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

CNN

By Andrew Torgan and Daniel Wine, CNN

(CNN) — We hope you are relaxing this Memorial Day weekend and enjoying your favorite outdoor activities. Wherever you are, don’t forget the sunscreen. Check out these tips on which types of sunscreen you should choose — and which types to avoid. Without further ado, here’s what else you need to know to Start Your Week Smart.

The weekend that was

• The White House and House Republicans have an agreement in principle on a deal to raise the debt ceiling for two years and cap spending, House Speaker Kevin McCarthy confirmed, moving the nation one step back from the brink of a historic default.

• The Texas House of Representatives voted to impeach Attorney General Ken Paxton, an unprecedented move following a legislative probe that faulted the third-term Republican for a yearslong pattern of corruption, including abusing his office’s powers, retaliating against whistleblowers and obstructing justice.

• Russia launched its largest drone attack of the conflict yet on Ukraine’s capital Kyiv, leaving one person dead and sparking fires across the city. The attacks come amid rumors of an imminent Ukrainian counteroffensive.

• A South Carolina judge temporarily blocked the state’s new abortion restrictions from going into effect, just one day after Gov. Henry McMaster signed them into law.

• Polls have opened in Turkey’s presidential runoff today as President Recep Tayyip Erdogan fights for a historic third term. Erdogan is going head-to-head with opposition leader Kemal Kilicdaroglu.

The week ahead

Monday

The last Monday in May is Memorial Day — a day to honor the men and women who died while serving in the US military. Initially known as Decoration Day, it originated in the years following the Civil War and became an official federal holiday in 1971.

Tuesday

Disgraced Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes is expected to report to prison after her last-minute bid to avoid starting her sentence was denied by an appellate court earlier this month. Holmes was originally due to begin serving her 11-year sentence for defrauding investors on April 27 but filed an appeal seeking to remain free on bail while she fought to overturn her conviction.

Wednesday

Some Amazon corporate workers have announced plans to walk off the job over frustrations with the company’s return-to-work policies, among other issues, in a sign of heightened tensions at the e-commerce giant after multiple rounds of layoffs. The work stoppage is being jointly organized by an internal climate justice worker group and a remote work advocacy group, according to an email from organizers and public social media posts. Workers participating have two main demands: that Amazon put climate impact at the forefront of its decision-making, and that the company provide greater flexibility for how and where employees work.

Thursday

June 1 marks the beginning of Pride Month, when the world’s LGBTQ communities come together and celebrate the freedom to be themselves.

Friday

If it’s the first Friday of the month, it’s employment report day. We will see how many jobs the US economy added in May following April’s surprising increase — and what the numbers mean for you, your employer and the Federal Reserve.

And we’ll end the workweek on a high note: It’s also National Donut Day!

One Thing: A maritime ‘Me Too’ moment

In this week’s “One Thing” podcast, CNN Investigates senior writers Blake Ellis and Melanie Hicken join the show joins to discuss how the US Coast Guard has allowed sexual assault at sea to go unchecked for years, and how one young mariner helped bring the problem to light. Listen here for more

Photos of the week

Check out more images from the week that was, curated by CNN Photos.

What’s happening in entertainment

TV and streaming

Tonight is a bittersweet night for fans of two popular HBO shows. “Succession” and “Barry” will air their series finales at 9 p.m. ET and 10 p.m. ET respectively. No “Succession” spoilers here for those who are still catching up … unless you really want to know where things stand with the backbiting Roys before the finale kicks off. (HBO, like CNN, is a unit of Warner Bros. Discovery.)

The much-loved AppleTV+ series “Ted Lasso” draws to a close Wednesday, when AFC Richmond play their final match of the season. Regardless of where all the characters wind up, rest assured it won’t be the last you’ll see of Hannah Waddingham. (“Ted Lasso” is produced by Warner Bros. Television, which like CNN is part of Warner Bros. Discovery.)

And if words are your thing, you won’t want to miss the Scripps National Spelling Bee, airing Wednesday and Thursday from 8-10 p.m. ET on ION.

In theaters

“Spider-Man: Across the Spiderverse,” the sequel to the Oscar-winning animated hit featuring Miles Morales, arrives Friday. 

What’s happening in sports

At a glance …

The 107th running of the Indianapolis 500 — known as “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing”— takes place later today.

In the NBA playoffs, the Boston Celtics are on the verge of making history after a dramatic buzzer-beating victory against the Miami Heat to force a Game 7. Boston is trying to become the first team to win a playoff series after trailing 3-0. The winner of that series will play the Denver Nuggets, who swept the Los Angeles Lakers in four games to advance to the NBA Finals for the first time in the franchise’s 47-year history.

For more of your favorite sports, head on over to Bleacher Report, which — like CNN — is owned by Warner Bros. Discovery.

Quiz time!

Looking for a challenge this holiday weekend? Take CNN’s weekly news quiz to see how much you remember from the week that was! So far, only 9% of fellow quiz fans have gotten eight or more questions right. How will you fare?

Play me off…

‘Summertime’

Kick back this holiday weekend with a Gershwin classic performed by the one and only Willie Nelson. (Click here to view)

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Start your week smart: Debt ceiling deal, Texas impeachment, Russian drone attack appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/news/national-world/cnn-national/2023/05/28/start-your-week-smart-debt-ceiling-deal-texas-impeachment-russian-drone-attack-2/feed/ 0 ]]>
Where to go this summer: A dozen destination ideas https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/where-to-go-this-summer-a-dozen-destination-ideas/ https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/where-to-go-this-summer-a-dozen-destination-ideas/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 12:53:25 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/where-to-go-this-summer-a-dozen-destination-ideas/ By Jane Levere, CNN (CNN) — Summer 2023 is poised to be a travel blockbuster. Globally, international arrivals were already at 80% of pre-pandemic levels in the first quarter of 2023, and a strong summer is expected in the Northern Hemisphere, according to the UN World Tourism Organization. That means planning a summer vacation this

The post Where to go this summer: A dozen destination ideas appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
By Jane Levere, CNN

(CNN) — Summer 2023 is poised to be a travel blockbuster.

Globally, international arrivals were already at 80% of pre-pandemic levels in the first quarter of 2023, and a strong summer is expected in the Northern Hemisphere, according to the UN World Tourism Organization.

That means planning a summer vacation this year could pose a challenge to travelers, as flights to many destinations are filling up and some airlines are charging record airfares. Hotels and rental properties are booking up in popular locations, too.

So if you’re still thinking of taking a summer vacation, act quickly and consider the following destination ideas to get you started:

Madrid, Spain

Madrid  is “the most underrated” capital in Europe, says Jack Ezon, founder and managing partner of EMBARK Beyond, a luxury travel advisory. The city offers a buzzy food scene and fabulous shopping, “all at a fraction of the cost of its more famous neighbors.”

The city’s art and culture are world-class; the Prado and Reina Sofia museums are just two of city’s many cultural offerings. Ezon also considers Madrid the “perfect base” from which to explore other famous Spanish destinations such as Toledo, Segovia and Seville.

New York City

Perhaps the Big Apple’s biggest story this summer is the citywide celebration of the 50th anniversary of the birth of hip-hop, on August 11, 1973, by DJ Kool Herc at a birthday party in the Bronx.

The anniversary celebration includes exhibits at the Bronx Terminal Market, New York Public Library, Museum of the City of New York, Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute and Queens Public Library, as well as an open mic June 30 at the Columbus Library and Hush Tours’ three-hour “birthplace of hip-hop” tour, which visits Harlem and the Bronx.

Cape Town, South Africa

Considered by many to be the world’s most beautiful city – home of Table Mountain and the Cape Point Nature Reserve, among many gorgeous sights – Cape Town offers wonderful value compared to higher-priced and crowded summer vacation destinations in Europe and the Mediterranean.  It also offers world-class dining, tours of multiple nearby wine farms or estates, and opportunities to paraglide, rappel, swim with seals and kayak with penguins.

Piedmont region, Italy

Instead of Italy’s crowded Amalfi Coast, head northwest to Piedmont, says Jan Tenzer, another EMBARK Beyond travel advisor. The region “has it all – luxury accommodations, ancient castles, Michelin-rated dining and stunning vistas.”  The Piazza Duomo restaurant housed in a palazzo in Alba holds a coveted three Michelin stars as well as a green star for sustainability. Other possible diversions include vineyard visits and even summer truffle-hunting.

Los Angeles, California

Tinseltown is marking its own major anniversary: the centennial of its iconic Hollywood sign, erected in 1923 for $21,000 by Los Angeles Times publisher Howard Chandler as a billboard for his upscale Hollywoodland real estate development.  For free views of the sign, take a hike in Griffith Park, Runyon Canyon or Bronson Canyon, or stop by the reservoir at Lake Hollywood Park for a stroll or picnic and direct view of the sign.

Peru

Jennifer Tombaugh, president of Tauck, a tour operator, recommends Peru, where the political protests earlier this year have died down; the US State Department’s travel advisory for Peru is now at the same level as Spain and the United Kingdom.

The dollar is strong here, and, as Tombaugh says, “Peruvians are welcoming travelers back with open arms.”  Top sights include the capital city of Lima where there’s a world-renowned dining scene, the Sacred Valley of the Incas outside Cusco and Machu Picchu, a World Heritage Site that UNESCO calls “probably the most amazing urban creation of the Inca Empire at its height.”

Santa Fe, New Mexico

Santa Fe is never jam-packed, according to Janel Carnero, an EMBARK Beyond travel adviser who recommends a visit to the United States’ oldest state capital city, founded in 1610. Santa Fe’s rich history of Hispanic, Native American and Anglo cultures can be seen in its art, architecture, cuisine and traditions.

Visitors can “breathe in the fresh air of local markets,” Carnero says, “watch a local artist create a masterpiece right in front of them,” and be captured by “sunsets and stars.” Among the markets, the Santa Fe Artists Market is held Saturdays from March to December and the Santa Fe Farmers’ Market is on Saturdays and Tuesdays.

Vienna, Austria

Vienna is poised “to be one of Europe’s leading destinations, an indoor/outdoor city that is multicultural and celebrates its history, music, art and culinary scenes,” says Virtuoso, a global network of travel agencies specializing in experiential and luxury travel.

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the 1873 Vienna World’s Fair; the 200th anniversary of the founding of world-renowned Viennese glass manufacturer Lobmeyr; and the 300th anniversary of the opening of the palatial Belvedere Museum, all celebrated with special exhibitions.

Buenos Aires, Argentina

This gorgeous, cosmopolitan city is the capital of Argentina, culture capital of Latin America and tango capital of the world, not to mention the birthplace of Pope Francis.  It also has many terrific hotels, including the Alvear Icon Hotel & Residences in Puerto Madero, a lively neighborhood that was once a port.  And perhaps most importantly, the city offers excellent value, in part because it will be the winter/low season there during the Northern Hemisphere’s summer.

Malta

This island country off the coast of Italy offers a unique combination of Mediterranean and Arabic cultures. It’s home to three UNESCO World Heritage Sites, including megalithic temples that date to the 4th millennium BC. And the fortified capital city of Valletta, another UNESCO site, is “one of the most concentrated historic areas in the world.”

The archipelago also provides opportunities for dining, sailing and nightlife, as well as numerous religious sites. Parts of “Game of Thrones” were filmed here; fans can tour the locations.

Thailand

Thailand offers a terrific respite “from crowded tourist spots in Europe,” says Deborah Gellis, of EMBARK Beyond. Highlights here include beach resorts such as Koh Samui and Phuket, the bustling national capital of Bangkok and the northern province of Chiang Rai, famous for its Buddhist temples.

Although summer is the rainy season, Gellis says showers are often brief and intermittent. Flights to Thailand could be pricey because of limited capacity, but once you get there it’s a terrific value.

Albania

Albania is a Mediterranean gem that’s likely to be less crowded this summer than Greece and Croatia, says Joao Donadel, another EMBARK Beyond travel advisor.  It has a gorgeous coastline with pristine beaches; Butrint, a UNESCO World Heritage Site that was once a Greek colony and Roman city, later abandoned during the Middle Ages; plus opportunities to hike, trek and explore the great outdoors.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Where to go this summer: A dozen destination ideas appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/where-to-go-this-summer-a-dozen-destination-ideas/feed/ 0 ]]>
Cómo consultar los resultados de las elecciones en España 2023: ciudades, municipios y barrios https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/como-consultar-los-resultados-de-las-elecciones-en-espana-2023-ciudades-municipios-y-barrios/ https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/como-consultar-los-resultados-de-las-elecciones-en-espana-2023-ciudades-municipios-y-barrios/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 12:51:43 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/como-consultar-los-resultados-de-las-elecciones-en-espana-2023-ciudades-municipios-y-barrios/ Rocío Muñoz-Ledo (CNN Español) — Las mayoría de las comunidades autónomas y municipios de España celebraran el 28 de mayo unas elecciones que muchos ven como una suerte de termómetro para lo que pueda ocurrir a finales de año, cuando se lleven a cabo las generales en las que se renovará el Congreso de los

The post Cómo consultar los resultados de las elecciones en España 2023: ciudades, municipios y barrios appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
Rocío Muñoz-Ledo

(CNN Español) — Las mayoría de las comunidades autónomas y municipios de España celebraran el 28 de mayo unas elecciones que muchos ven como una suerte de termómetro para lo que pueda ocurrir a finales de año, cuando se lleven a cabo las generales en las que se renovará el Congreso de los Diputados y el Senado.

Solo las comunidades autónomas conocidas como “históricas” —Andalucía, Cataluña, Galicia, País Vasco y Castilla y León— quedarán fuera de la convocatoria del domingo 28 de mayo, dado que las legislaturas de cuatro años de sus Asambleas Legislativas terminarán en años posteriores.

¿Por qué son importantes las elecciones municipales y autonómicas de España rumbo a las generales?

En las elecciones municipales y autonómicas, las fuerzas políticas se batirán para mantener la continuidad de los gobiernos que lideren y conseguir la presidencia en aquellas autonomías donde hasta ahora les haya sido esquiva.

Aquí te decimos cómo consultar los resultados de las elecciones municipales y autonómicas en vivo, desde la página web oficial del Gobierno de España:

Consulta los resultados de las elecciones en España 2023: municipios y comunidades autónomas

Una vez que termine la votación y a medida que se vayan contando los votos, podrás consultar los resultados de las elecciones municipales y autonómicas de España a través del sitio web Info Electoral del Ministerio del Interior.

Recuerda que estos resultados son provisionales y, según el Ministerio del Interior, el escrutinio oficial y definitivo se realiza por las Juntas Electorales competentes y comienza tres días después de las elecciones.

Los resultados oficiales se publican en el Boletín Oficial del Estado.

Para entrar a la web de Info Electoral, haz clic aquí  Después debes entrar al apartado de “28M elecciones locales” Una vez dentro, vuelve selecciona la opción de “consultar” que se encuentra en el apartado de “resultados provisionales”

Con información de Pau Mosquera

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Cómo consultar los resultados de las elecciones en España 2023: ciudades, municipios y barrios appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/como-consultar-los-resultados-de-las-elecciones-en-espana-2023-ciudades-municipios-y-barrios/feed/ 0 ]]>
Start your week smart: Debt ceiling deal, Texas impeachment, Russian drone attack https://kesq.com/news/national-world/cnn-national/2023/05/28/start-your-week-smart-debt-ceiling-deal-texas-impeachment-russian-drone-attack/ https://kesq.com/news/national-world/cnn-national/2023/05/28/start-your-week-smart-debt-ceiling-deal-texas-impeachment-russian-drone-attack/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 12:47:08 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/start-your-week-smart-debt-ceiling-deal-texas-impeachment-russian-drone-attack/ By Andrew Torgan and Daniel Wine, CNN (CNN) — We hope you are relaxing this Memorial Day weekend and enjoying your favorite outdoor activities. Wherever you are, don’t forget the sunscreen. Check out these tips on which types of sunscreen you should choose — and which types to avoid. Without further ado, here’s what else

The post Start your week smart: Debt ceiling deal, Texas impeachment, Russian drone attack appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
By Andrew Torgan and Daniel Wine, CNN

(CNN) — We hope you are relaxing this Memorial Day weekend and enjoying your favorite outdoor activities. Wherever you are, don’t forget the sunscreen. Check out these tips on which types of sunscreen you should choose — and which types to avoid. Without further ado, here’s what else you need to know to Start Your Week Smart.

The weekend that was

• The White House and House Republicans have an agreement in principle on a deal to raise the debt ceiling for two years and cap spending, House Speaker Kevin McCarthy confirmed, moving the nation one step back from the brink of a historic default.

• The Texas House of Representatives voted to impeach Attorney General Ken Paxton, an unprecedented move following a legislative probe that faulted the third-term Republican for a yearslong pattern of corruption, including abusing his office’s powers, retaliating against whistleblowers and obstructing justice.

• Russia launched its largest drone attack of the conflict yet on Ukraine’s capital Kyiv, leaving one person dead and sparking fires across the city. The attacks come amid rumors of an imminent Ukrainian counteroffensive.

• A South Carolina judge temporarily blocked the state’s new abortion restrictions from going into effect, just one day after Gov. Henry McMaster signed them into law.

• Polls have opened in Turkey’s presidential runoff today as President Recep Tayyip Erdogan fights for a historic third term. Erdogan is going head-to-head with opposition leader Kemal Kilicdaroglu.

The week ahead

Monday

The last Monday in May is Memorial Day — a day to honor the men and women who died while serving in the US military. Initially known as Decoration Day, it originated in the years following the Civil War and became an official federal holiday in 1971.

Tuesday

Disgraced Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes is expected to report to prison after her last-minute bid to avoid starting her sentence was denied by an appellate court earlier this month. Holmes was originally due to begin serving her 11-year sentence for defrauding investors on April 27 but filed an appeal seeking to remain free on bail while she fought to overturn her conviction.

Wednesday

Some Amazon corporate workers have announced plans to walk off the job over frustrations with the company’s return-to-work policies, among other issues, in a sign of heightened tensions at the e-commerce giant after multiple rounds of layoffs. The work stoppage is being jointly organized by an internal climate justice worker group and a remote work advocacy group, according to an email from organizers and public social media posts. Workers participating have two main demands: that Amazon put climate impact at the forefront of its decision-making, and that the company provide greater flexibility for how and where employees work.

Thursday

June 1 marks the beginning of Pride Month, when the world’s LGBTQ communities come together and celebrate the freedom to be themselves.

Friday

If it’s the first Friday of the month, it’s employment report day. We will see how many jobs the US economy added in May following April’s surprising increase — and what the numbers mean for you, your employer and the Federal Reserve.

And we’ll end the workweek on a high note: It’s also National Donut Day!

One Thing: A maritime ‘Me Too’ moment

In this week’s “One Thing” podcast, CNN Investigates senior writers Blake Ellis and Melanie Hicken join the show joins to discuss how the US Coast Guard has allowed sexual assault at sea to go unchecked for years, and how one young mariner helped bring the problem to light. Listen here for more

Photos of the week

Check out more images from the week that was, curated by CNN Photos.

What’s happening in entertainment

TV and streaming

Tonight is a bittersweet night for fans of two popular HBO shows. “Succession” and “Barry” will air their series finales at 9 p.m. ET and 10 p.m. ET respectively. No “Succession” spoilers here for those who are still catching up … unless you really want to know where things stand with the backbiting Roys before the finale kicks off. (HBO, like CNN, is a unit of Warner Bros. Discovery.)

The much-loved AppleTV+ series “Ted Lasso” draws to a close Wednesday, when AFC Richmond play their final match of the season. Regardless of where all the characters wind up, rest assured it won’t be the last you’ll see of Hannah Waddingham. (“Ted Lasso” is produced by Warner Bros. Television, which like CNN is part of Warner Bros. Discovery.)

And if words are your thing, you won’t want to miss the Scripps National Spelling Bee, airing Wednesday and Thursday from 8-10 p.m. ET on ION.

In theaters

“Spider-Man: Across the Spiderverse,” the sequel to the Oscar-winning animated hit featuring Miles Morales, arrives Friday. 

What’s happening in sports

At a glance …

The 107th running of the Indianapolis 500 — known as “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing”— takes place later today.

In the NBA playoffs, the Boston Celtics are on the verge of making history after a dramatic buzzer-beating victory against the Miami Heat to force a Game 7. Boston is trying to become the first team to win a playoff series after trailing 3-0. The winner of that series will play the Denver Nuggets, who swept the Los Angeles Lakers in four games to advance to the NBA Finals for the first time in the franchise’s 47-year history.

For more of your favorite sports, head on over to Bleacher Report, which — like CNN — is owned by Warner Bros. Discovery.

Quiz time!

Looking for a challenge this holiday weekend? Take CNN’s weekly news quiz to see how much you remember from the week that was! So far, only 9% of fellow quiz fans have gotten eight or more questions right. How will you fare?

Play me off…

‘Summertime’

Kick back this holiday weekend with a Gershwin classic performed by the one and only Willie Nelson. (Click here to view)

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Start your week smart: Debt ceiling deal, Texas impeachment, Russian drone attack appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/news/national-world/cnn-national/2023/05/28/start-your-week-smart-debt-ceiling-deal-texas-impeachment-russian-drone-attack/feed/ 0 ]]>
French film director attacks Macron during Palme d’Or acceptance speech https://kesq.com/entertainment/cnn-entertainment/2023/05/28/french-film-director-attacks-macron-during-palme-dor-acceptance-speech/ https://kesq.com/entertainment/cnn-entertainment/2023/05/28/french-film-director-attacks-macron-during-palme-dor-acceptance-speech/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 12:44:06 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/french-film-director-attacks-macron-during-palme-dor-acceptance-speech/ By Niamh Kennedy (CNN) — French film director Justine Triet condemned what she called French President Emmanuel Macron’s “shocking” repression of the pension reform protests during her Palme d’Or acceptance speech at the Cannes Film Festival on Saturday. After stepping on stage to accept the award for her film, “The Anatomy of a Chute,” Triet

The post French film director attacks Macron during Palme d’Or acceptance speech appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
By Niamh Kennedy

(CNN) — French film director Justine Triet condemned what she called French President Emmanuel Macron’s “shocking” repression of the pension reform protests during her Palme d’Or acceptance speech at the Cannes Film Festival on Saturday.

After stepping on stage to accept the award for her film, “The Anatomy of a Chute,” Triet referenced the wave of protests that have gripped France this year.

“This year this country has been taken over by a historic, extremely powerful, unanimous protest on pension reform. This protest has been denied and repressed in a shocking way,” Triet stressed.

Triet maintained that an “increasingly uninhibited” power pattern is breaking out in several areas of French society including cinema.

“The commodification of culture that the neoliberal government defends is in the process of breaking the French cultural exception,” Triet continued. She was presented the award by the iconic actress Jane Fonda onstage.

“We have to make room for them, room that I was given 15 years ago in a slightly less hostile world where it was still possible to make mistakes and start again,” Triet added.

Triet is just the third woman to win the Palme d’Or, one of cinema’s tpp prizes, after New Zealand’s Jane Campion and France’s Julia Ducournau.

Her work – a drama about a woman suspected of her husband’s murder – beat off competition including Wes Anderson’s “Asteroid City.”

The second-highest prize after the Palme d’Or, the Grand Prix, went to British director Jonathan Glazer’s for his film “Zone of Interest,” about a family living next to Auschwitz.

‘Spoiled child’

Triet’s speech sparked outrage from some, including the French Culture Minister Rima Abdul Malak, who was present at Saturday’s closing ceremony.

“Happy to see the Palme d’Or awarded to Justine Triet, the 10th for France! But dismayed by the unfairness of her speech. This film could not have been made without our French model of film financing, which allows for a diversity that is unique in the world. Let’s not forget it,” Malak said in a tweet Saturday.

The mayor of Cannes, David Lisnard described Triet as a “spoiled child” in a tweet Saturday.

In his tweet, Lisnard congratulated the winners from across the world who accepted their prizes with “joy and respect.”

“A single, political complaint, that of the French director, with the speech of a spoiled child and so conformist, as she receives the prestigious Palme d’Or for her subsidized film,” Lisnard continued.

France’s social unrest has cast a shadow over this year’s instalment of the film festival. Trade union, CGT Energie which represents energy and mining workers, previously announced “100 days of action and anger” coinciding with the festival period. This created fears that protests, and electricity outages may impact festival events.

To counter this, the Alpes Maritimes regional authorities issued an order on May 11 banning all protests outside the Palais de Festival in Cannes.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post French film director attacks Macron during Palme d’Or acceptance speech appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/entertainment/cnn-entertainment/2023/05/28/french-film-director-attacks-macron-during-palme-dor-acceptance-speech/feed/ 0 ]]>
Government tries to claw back money so Jan. 6 rioters don’t profit from online appeals https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/government-tries-to-claw-back-money-so-jan-6-rioters-dont-profit-from-online-appeals/ Sun, 28 May 2023 12:41:39 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/government-tries-to-claw-back-money-so-jan-6-rioters-dont-profit-from-online-appeals/

By MICHAEL KUNZELMAN Associated Press Less than two months after he pleaded guilty to storming the U.S. Capitol, Texas resident Daniel Goodwyn appeared on Tucker Carlson’s then-Fox News show and promoted a website where supporters could donate money to Goodwyn and other rioters whom the site called “political prisoners.” The Justice Department now wants Goodwyn

The post Government tries to claw back money so Jan. 6 rioters don’t profit from online appeals appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

By MICHAEL KUNZELMAN
Associated Press

Less than two months after he pleaded guilty to storming the U.S. Capitol, Texas resident Daniel Goodwyn appeared on Tucker Carlson’s then-Fox News show and promoted a website where supporters could donate money to Goodwyn and other rioters whom the site called “political prisoners.”

The Justice Department now wants Goodwyn to give up more than $25,000 he raised — a clawback that is part of a growing effort by the government to prevent rioters from being able to personally profit from participating in the attack that shook the foundations of American democracy.

An Associated Press review of court records shows that prosecutors in the more than 1,000 of the Jan. 6, 2021, criminal cases are increasingly asking judges to impose fines on top of prison sentences to offset donations from supporters of the Capitol rioters.

Dozens of defendants have set up online fundraising appeals for help with legal fees, and prosecutors acknowledge there’s nothing wrong with asking for help for attorney expenses. But the Justice Department has, in some cases, questioned where the money is really going because many of those charged have had government-funded legal representation.

Most of the fundraising efforts appear on GiveSendGo, which bills itself as “The #1 Free Christian Fundraising Site” and has become a haven for Jan. 6 defendants barred from using mainstream crowdfunding sites, including GoFundMe, to raise money. The rioters often proclaim their innocence and portray themselves as victims of government oppression, even as they cut deals to plead guilty and cooperate with prosecutors.

Their fundraising success suggests that many people in the United States still view Jan. 6 rioters as patriots and cling to the baseless belief that Democrats stole the 2020 presidential election from Donald Trump. The former president himself has fueled that idea, pledging to pardon rioters if he is elected.

Markus Maly, a Virginia man scheduled to be sentenced next month for assaulting police at the Capitol, raised more than $16,000 from an online campaign that described him as a “January 6 P.O.W.” and asked for money for his family. Prosecutors have requested a $16,000-plus fine, noting that Maly had a public defender and did not owe any legal fees.

“He should not be able to use his own notoriety gained in the commission of his crimes to ‘capitalize’ on his participation in the Capitol breach in this way,” a prosecutor wrote in court papers.

So far this year, prosecutors have sought more than $390,000 in fines against at least 21 riot defendants, in amounts ranging from $450 to more than $71,000, according to the AP’s tally.

Judges have imposed at least $124,127 in fines against 33 riot defendants this year. In the previous two years, judges ordered more than 100 riot defendants to collectively pay more than $240,000 in fines.

Separately, judges have ordered hundreds of convicted rioters to pay more than $524,000 in restitution to the government to cover more than $2.8 million in damage to the Capitol and other Jan. 6-related expenses.

More rioters facing the most serious charges and longest prison terms are now being sentenced. They tend to also be the prolific fundraisers, which could help explain the recent surge in fines requests.

Earlier this month, the judge who sentenced Nathaniel DeGrave to more than three years in prison also ordered him to pay a $25,000 fine. Prosecutors noted that the Nevada resident “incredibly” raised over $120,000 in GiveSendGo fundraising campaigns that referred to him as “Beijing Biden’s political prisoner” in “America’s Gitmo” — a reference to the Guantanamo Bay detention center.

“He did this despite seeking to cooperate with the government and admitting he and his co-conspirators were guilty since at least November 2021,” a prosecutor wrote.

Lawyer William Shipley, who has represented DeGrave and more than two dozen other Jan. 6 defendants, said he advises clients to avoid raising money under the auspices of being a political prisoner if they intend to plead guilty.

“Until they admit they committed a crime, they’re perfectly entitled to shout from the rooftops that the only reason they’re being held is because of politics,” Shipley said. “It’s just First Amendment political speech.”

Shipley said he provided the judge with documentation showing that DeGrave raised approximately $25,000 more than what he paid his lawyers.

“I’ve never had to do it until these cases because I’ve never had clients that had third-party fundraising like this,” Shipley said. “There’s a segment of the population that is sympathetic toward the plight of these defendants.”

GiveSendGo co-founder Heather Wilson said her site’s decision to allow legal defense funds for Capitol riot defendants “is rooted in our society’s commitment to the presumption of innocence and the freedom for all individuals to hire private attorneys.”

The government’s push for more fines comes as it reaches a milestone in the largest federal investigation in American history: Just over 500 defendants have been sentenced for Jan. 6 crimes.

Judges aren’t rubber-stamping prosecutors’ fine requests.

Prosecutors sought a more than $70,000 fine for Peter Schwartz, a Kentucky man who attacked police officers outside the Capitol with pepper spray and a chair. U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta sentenced Schwartz this month to more than 14 years in prison — the longest so far in a Capitol riot case — but didn’t impose a fine.

Prosecutors suspect Schwartz tried to profit from his fundraising campaign, “Patriot Pete Political Prisoner in DC.” But his lawyer, Dennis Boyle, said there is no evidence of that.

The judge “basically said that if the money was being used for attorneys’ fees or other costs like that, there was no basis for a fine,” Boyle said.

A jury convicted romance novel cover model John Strand of storming the Capitol with Dr. Simone Gold, a California physician who is a leading figure in the anti-vaccine movement. Now prosecutors are seeking a $50,000 fine on top of a prison term for Strand when a judge sentences him on Thursday.

Strand has raised more than $17,300 for his legal defense without disclosing that he has a taxpayer-funded lawyer, according to prosecutors. They say Strand appears to have “substantial financial means,” living in a home that was purchased for more than $3 million last year.

“Strand has raised, and continues to raise, money on his website based upon his false statements and misrepresentations on the events of January 6,” prosecutors wrote.

Goodwyn, who appeared on Carlson’s show in March, is scheduled to be sentenced next month. Defense lawyer Carolyn Stewart described prosecutors are “demanding blood from a stone” in asking for the $25,000 fine.

“He received that amount in charity to help him in his debt for legal fees for former attorneys and this for unknown reasons is bothersome to the government,” Stewart wrote.

___

Associated Press writer Alanna Durkin Richer in Boston contributed to this report.

The post Government tries to claw back money so Jan. 6 rioters don’t profit from online appeals appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
]]>
Don’t expect the stock markets to rejoice about the debt ceiling deal https://kesq.com/money/cnn-business-consumer/2023/05/28/dont-expect-the-stock-markets-to-rejoice-about-the-debt-ceiling-deal/ https://kesq.com/money/cnn-business-consumer/2023/05/28/dont-expect-the-stock-markets-to-rejoice-about-the-debt-ceiling-deal/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 12:40:37 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/dont-expect-the-stock-markets-to-rejoice-about-the-debt-ceiling-deal/ By Elisabeth Buchwald, CNN New York (CNN) — You’d expect the stock market to surge after the White House and House Republicans reached a tentative deal to raise the debt ceiling, But markets may have other plans. The stock market, for the most part, has been ignoring the serious risks associated with the United States

The post Don’t expect the stock markets to rejoice about the debt ceiling deal appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
By Elisabeth Buchwald, CNN

New York (CNN) — You’d expect the stock market to surge after the White House and House Republicans reached a tentative deal to raise the debt ceiling, But markets may have other plans.

The stock market, for the most part, has been ignoring the serious risks associated with the United States defaulting on its debt. Even if Congress passes a bill to raise the debt ceiling and President Joe Biden signs it, it could take months before stocks and other financial markets move on.

“One of the concerns I have is that even in the run-up to an agreement, when one does occur, there can be substantial financial market distress,” Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said last week.

“We’re seeing just the beginnings of it,” she said, referring to stock and bond market volatility in recent days.

Immediate market impact of a debt ceiling deal

If markets get what they ultimately want — no debt default — they’ll have to buckle up for a potentially rough ride immediately after a deal is signed.

That’s because the Treasury will instantly need to replenish the cash it burned through during the period of extraordinary measures when it could not borrow more money.

This will create more competition for equity from investors, said Michael Reynolds, vice president of investment strategy at Glenmede. After weighing their options, many investors may find the returns from investing in US Treasuries better than stocks. That will temporarily suck some liquidity out of the stock market, he said.

A look back at the 2011 debt ceiling crisis

In 2011, lawmakers came to an agreement on raising the debt limit just hours before the United States would have defaulted. Two days later, Standard & Poor’s downgraded US debt for the first time in history.

It took two months for stocks to recover the losses resulting from the downgrade and the initial sell-off leading up to the so-called X-date, when the government no longer has the ability to meet all its financial obligations.

Could history repeat itself?

“It wouldn’t be surprising if the 2011 pattern repeats again,” said George Mateyo, chief investment officer at Key Private Bank.

While he doesn’t expect a major credit agency to downgrade US debt before or after a deal to raise the debt ceiling is reached, he said the current standoff could lead to a big loss of confidence in America’s financial system.

That’s why he’s anticipating monthslong market volatility even once a deal is reached.

“Just because we get the debt limit raised, we’re not out of the woods,” Mateyo told CNN.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Don’t expect the stock markets to rejoice about the debt ceiling deal appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/money/cnn-business-consumer/2023/05/28/dont-expect-the-stock-markets-to-rejoice-about-the-debt-ceiling-deal/feed/ 0 ]]>
Con Rafael Nadal ausente y el dominio de Iga Swiatek amenazado, el Abierto de Francia es difícil de predecir https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/con-rafael-nadal-ausente-y-el-dominio-de-iga-swiatek-amenazado-el-abierto-de-francia-es-dificil-de-predecir/ https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/con-rafael-nadal-ausente-y-el-dominio-de-iga-swiatek-amenazado-el-abierto-de-francia-es-dificil-de-predecir/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 12:29:46 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/con-rafael-nadal-ausente-y-el-dominio-de-iga-swiatek-amenazado-el-abierto-de-francia-es-dificil-de-predecir/ Gonzalo Jimenez (CNN) — Cuando Rafael Nadal anunció su ausencia del Abierto de Francia a principios de mes, parecía el principio del fin de una era. Tras sufrir una lesión de cadera desde el Abierto de Australia, Nadal, 14 veces campeón en Roland-Garros, se pierde el segundo Grand Slam del año por primera vez desde

The post Con Rafael Nadal ausente y el dominio de Iga Swiatek amenazado, el Abierto de Francia es difícil de predecir appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
Gonzalo Jimenez

(CNN) — Cuando Rafael Nadal anunció su ausencia del Abierto de Francia a principios de mes, parecía el principio del fin de una era.

Tras sufrir una lesión de cadera desde el Abierto de Australia, Nadal, 14 veces campeón en Roland-Garros, se pierde el segundo Grand Slam del año por primera vez desde su debut en 2005.

También anunció que el año que viene será su último en el tenis profesional, lo que, cuando llegue, será un momento decisivo en la historia de los grandes de tierra batida, una competición que Nadal ha dominado durante tanto tiempo.

De momento, lo más importante es saber quién ganará el Abierto de Francia de este año en París, que comienza este domingo y concluirá el 11 de junio.

Cómo verlo

En Estados Unidos, el Abierto de Francia se puede ver en la cadena NBC, el servicio de streaming Peacock, Tennis Channel y Bally Sports. En Europa, excepto en Francia, el torneo se emite en Eurosport.

La lista de emisoras internacionales y el cuadro completo están disponibles en la página web del Abierto de Francia.

Cuadro masculino muy abierto

Carlos Alcaraz, primer cabeza de serie, es un especialista en tierra batida y llevaba 12 partidos invicto antes de sufrir una sorprendente derrota contra Fábián Marozsán, número 115 del mundo, en el Abierto de Italia.

Alcaraz celebra contra Jan-Lennard Struff en el Madrid Open. (Crédito: Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)

Si quiere conquistar su segundo gran título, el tenista de 20 años tendrá que superar en semifinales a Novak Djokovic, dos veces campeón del Abierto de Francia.

Una victoria en París permitiría a Djokovic ganar su 23º título de Grand Slam y superar a Nadal en el primer puesto de la lista de tenistas masculinos de todos los tiempos, afianzándose aún más como el mejor tenista masculino de la historia.

Pero el serbio, vencedor en el Abierto de Australia a principios de año, ha pasado apuros esta temporada en tierra batida, sin pasar de cuartos de final en tres torneos y perdiéndose otro por una lesión en el codo.

“Ya está aquí una nueva generación”, dijo Djokovic tras su derrota en cuartos de final del Abierto de Italia.

“Quiero decir, Alcaraz es el número 1 del mundo desde [el 22 de mayo]. Obviamente, está jugando un tenis increíble. Creo que también es bueno para nuestro deporte que haya caras nuevas, chicos nuevos. Es normal.

“Llevamos años diciéndolo, que podemos esperar que llegue, que llegue ese momento en el que se produzca una especie de relevo generacional”.

Djokovic ejecuta un revés contra Holger Rune en el Abierto de Italia. (Crédito: Alex Pantling/Getty Images)

El hecho de que Djokovic no haya ganado ningún título desde el Abierto de Australia y la sorprendente derrota de Alcaraz en Roma quizás den esperanzas a algunos de los otros aspirantes en París este año.

Daniil Medvedev, campeón del Abierto de Italia la semana pasada, atraviesa un excelente momento de forma y tiene la ventaja de encontrarse en el lado opuesto del cuadro al de Alcaraz y Djokovic.

Casper Ruud y Stefanos Tsitsipas, ambos ex finalistas del Abierto de Francia, confían en tener una buena actuación, mientras que Holger Rune, sexto cabeza de serie, parece ser una estrella para el futuro tras eliminar a Djokovic en el Abierto de Italia.

Surgen las ‘tres grandes’

En el cuadro femenino, la bicampeona del Abierto de Francia, Iga Swiatek, es la favorita, aunque no ha mostrado el mismo dominio en tierra batida que el año pasado, cuando se alzó con el título como parte de una racha récord de 37 victorias consecutivas.

Aryna Sabalenka y Elena Rybakina, segunda y cuarta del mundo respectivamente, se han erigido en feroces rivales de Swiatek en la cima del tenis femenino y ambas han derrotado a la polaca en el último mes.

Swiatek en acción durante el Abierto de Australia en enero. (Crédito: Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)

Ese trío, al que algunos llaman ahora el “Big Three”, ha triunfado en los cuatro últimos Grand Slam: Swiatek en los Abiertos de Francia y Estados Unidos, Rybakina en Wimbledon y Sabalenka en Australia.

“Las condiciones de París deberían favorecer a Swiatek, se siente cómoda allí y está demostrando que definitivamente está jugando a un alto nivel de tenis”, dijo la experta de Eurosport y ex número 7 del mundo Barbara Schett antes del torneo.

“Creo que es bueno para Iga tener a estas dos jugadoras [Sabalenka y Rybakina] que pueden desafiarla y hacer que se mantenga en el número 1”, añadió Schett.

Swiatek, que lleva más de un año como número 1 del mundo, podría ser destronada por Sabalenka al frente de la clasificación tras el Abierto de Francia. Comienza su campaña contra la española Cristina Bucșa.

El calendario en el punto de mira

El tenis femenino se ha visto salpicado de polémicas en las últimas semanas, lo que ha puesto de nuevo en el punto de mira la programación del cuadro femenino de Roland-Garros.

En el Abierto de Madrid, se ordenó a las recogepelotas de la pista principal que llevaran camisetas cortas y faldas cortas, y a las jugadoras de la final de dobles no se les permitió hablar después del partido.

Más tarde se cambiaron las faldas de las recogepelotas por pantalones cortos; aunque se mantuvieron los crop tops- y el organizador del torneo, Gerard Tsobanian, declaró que era “inaceptable” no dar a las finalistas la oportunidad de hablar con los aficionados al final de su partido.

Después, en el Abierto de Italia, la final entre Rybakina y Anhelina Kalinina se reprogramó debido a la lluvia y no empezó hasta las 11 de la noche, hora local, del sábado, una situación que la ex jugadora Rennae Stubbs describió como una “abominación”.

Rybakina se enfrenta a Markéta Vondroušová en el Abierto de Italia. (Crédito: Alex Pantling/Getty Images)

La WTA, sin embargo, dijo que retrasar el partido era “lo correcto” en una declaración a Reuters.

Las preguntas sobre la programación pueden persistir en las próximas semanas, dada la forma en que las sesiones nocturnas fueron escrutadas en el Abierto de Francia del año pasado.

Sólo uno de los 10 partidos programados como sesión nocturna en 2022 incluía un encuentro femenino: el de segunda ronda entre Alizé Cornet y Jelena Ostapenko. La directora del torneo, Amelie Mauresmo, explicó cómo el tenis masculino tiene más “atractivo” que el femenino, a lo que Swiatek respondió tachando los comentarios de Mauresmo de “decepcionantes.”

En el Abierto de Francia de este año no falta el atractivo de las estrellas.

Junto al talentoso trío formado por Swiatek, Sabalenka y Rybakina, competirán por el título en Roland-Garros jugadoras de la talla de Jessica Pegula, Caroline Garcia, Coco Gauff y Ons Jabeur, ninguna de las cuales ha ganado un grand slam.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Con Rafael Nadal ausente y el dominio de Iga Swiatek amenazado, el Abierto de Francia es difícil de predecir appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/con-rafael-nadal-ausente-y-el-dominio-de-iga-swiatek-amenazado-el-abierto-de-francia-es-dificil-de-predecir/feed/ 0 ]]>
The benefits of ‘body doubling’ when you have ADHD, according to experts https://kesq.com/health/cnn-health/2023/05/28/the-benefits-of-body-doubling-when-you-have-adhd-according-to-experts/ https://kesq.com/health/cnn-health/2023/05/28/the-benefits-of-body-doubling-when-you-have-adhd-according-to-experts/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 12:16:45 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/the-benefits-of-body-doubling-when-you-have-adhd-according-to-experts/ By Kristen Rogers, CNN (CNN) — Once a week, ADHD coach Robin Nordmeyer joins a Zoom meeting with other coaches while she writes blogs, does administrative tasks or works on content for presentations she has been putting off. Nordmeyer, who has ADHD, isn’t necessarily using the meeting to collaborate with others — she just needs

The post The benefits of ‘body doubling’ when you have ADHD, according to experts appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
By Kristen Rogers, CNN

(CNN) — Once a week, ADHD coach Robin Nordmeyer joins a Zoom meeting with other coaches while she writes blogs, does administrative tasks or works on content for presentations she has been putting off.

Nordmeyer, who has ADHD, isn’t necessarily using the meeting to collaborate with others — she just needs their presence as a motivator to help her get things done.

“I run a business, and I have to balance lots of different areas of the business,” said Nordmeyer, cofounder and managing director of the Center for Living Well with ADHD-Minnesota, an ADHD coaching group near Minneapolis serving all ages.

“Some of those things come very easy — like, they’re in my wheelhouse, they energize me, I can’t wait to get to them,” Nordmeyer said. “And some of those things are a little more tedious, or I have some resistance around them.”

What Nordmeyer does to get through those tougher tasks is sometimes known as “body doubling,” a productivity and self-help strategy that involves working with another person around to help improve motivation and focus. It has been popular for some time among people with ADHD — attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder — especially during the pandemic.

“The idea is that the presence of another is essentially a gentle reminder to stay on task,” said Billy Roberts, clinical director of Focused Mind ADHD Counseling in Columbus, Ohio. “For folks (with) ADHD whose minds tend to wander and get off task, the body double somehow works as an external motivator to stay on task.”

Body doubling isn’t just for people with ADHD, but like many “coping strategies, something that can be helpful for anybody is more central and important for folks with ADHD,” said J. Russell Ramsay, professor of clinical psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine and codirector of the university’s ADHD Treatment and Research Program.

Why body doubling works

A neurodevelopmental disorder commonly diagnosed in childhood but lasting into adulthood, ADHD stems from underdeveloped or impaired executive function and self-regulation skills, according to Harvard University’s Center on the Developing Child. Those skills help us to plan, focus attention, remember instructions and multitask. Symptoms of ADHD include inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity — so people with this disorder might have trouble concentrating, staying organized, managing their time or controlling their impulses, which can affect both their work and personal lives, Roberts said.

If people with ADHD have no intrinsic interest in a task, Roberts said, they typically struggle with a lack of internal motivation to complete it or even to get started. Body doubling provides that motivation, experts said.

“It also draws on our social selves,” Ramsay said. “A lot of people with ADHD will say, ‘I have a hard time getting started on this if I’m doing it for myself, but if I know somebody else is relying on me, if somebody else is waiting outside for me to show up to go for our walk, I’m more likely to go and be there because I don’t want to let them down.’”

There doesn’t appear to be extensive research on body doubling for productivity, according to Roberts and other experts. “But I do know that the idea of externalizing motivation is a long-standing, evidence-based mechanism for managing ADHD,” Roberts said.

In theory, the method is pretty straightforward, but there a few factors to keep in mind to make the most of it.

How to use body doubling effectively

Body doubling can help with pretty much any task you’re having a hard time getting done — whether that’s work, chores, exercise, schoolwork or paperwork. The other person doesn’t have to be doing the same thing as you, unless the activity you need body doubling for — such as exercising — requires that assistance.

Be choosy about whom you ask to be your body double. The person should be as committed to you completing your work as you are, Roberts said — not distracting you with conversation or anything else. Choose someone who usually makes you feel comfortable and safe, and who can encourage you when necessary.

“It’s important to keep a body double session focused on its purpose,” Nordmeyer said. If conversations do come up, table them for later, perhaps during a break or dinner.

Asking someone to be your body double might feel awkward, but Roberts said the best approach is often a straightforward one. You could say, “It’s something I heard can help with productivity. Would you mind just being around me while I work on this? Maybe you have something you could work on, too.”

You could also barter with them, in a sense, by making an offer such as, “You help me organize my garage on Saturday; I’ll help you organize your home office on Sunday,” Ramsay said.

Those small first steps of seeking a partner and setting up the session get you started and keep you going, he added.

Scheduling regular body doubling sessions is one option, Nordmeyer said, or just ask whenever the need arises. How transparent you are about why you need a body double is up to you, as is whether you have more than one body double.

“It depends on the individual,” Roberts said. “If it turns into a distraction more than mindfulness, accountability or behavioral support, then you just want to rework things. You can kind of tinker with things until you find what works.”

Virtual body doubling

If you don’t have a friend or colleague to be your body double, you aren’t out of luck.

Some TikTok users, such as Allie K. Campbell, regularly go live while they’re working so others can use them as a virtual body double. There are also body doubling or coworking platforms or apps such as Flown, Focusmate or Flow Club.

In virtual sessions, “most body doubles ask you to share your camera, and a lot of people are real nervous about being visible,” Nordmeyer said. “The purpose of that is to make sure you’re still in your chair working. … But there might be other ways you can create that accountability through a chat feature.”

The benefits of body doubling are likely why some people like working on things in coffee shops, libraries or coworking spaces — which can be sources of passive body doubling if you don’t have someone to ask, Roberts said.

“Some people work better with community support and just the awareness of other people around them,” he added. “You saw that a lot with the pandemic, like people learning more about the kinds of structure they needed.

“We all think and work differently, and there’s nothing wrong with that,” Roberts said.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post The benefits of ‘body doubling’ when you have ADHD, according to experts appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/health/cnn-health/2023/05/28/the-benefits-of-body-doubling-when-you-have-adhd-according-to-experts/feed/ 0 ]]>
Debt ceiling tests Speaker McCarthy as he rides breezily through high-wire act of his career https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/debt-ceiling-tests-speaker-mccarthy-as-he-rides-breezily-through-high-wire-act-of-his-career/ Sun, 28 May 2023 12:03:29 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/debt-ceiling-tests-speaker-mccarthy-as-he-rides-breezily-through-high-wire-act-of-his-career/

By LISA MASCARO AP Congressional Correspondent WASHINGTON (AP) — One morning amid the debt ceiling crisis, House Speaker Kevin McCarthy climbed onto his mountain bike and took a ride along the National Mall, marveling at the monuments. The next day he arrived for negotiations at the Capitol carting in tortilla chips and queso for the

The post Debt ceiling tests Speaker McCarthy as he rides breezily through high-wire act of his career appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

By LISA MASCARO
AP Congressional Correspondent

WASHINGTON (AP) — One morning amid the debt ceiling crisis, House Speaker Kevin McCarthy climbed onto his mountain bike and took a ride along the National Mall, marveling at the monuments.

The next day he arrived for negotiations at the Capitol carting in tortilla chips and queso for the beleaguered reporters waiting outside his office during the 24/7 talks.

McCarthy, with his laid-back California vibe, was never Washington’s bet to become speaker, having almost missed seizing the gavel in a history-making spectacle at the start of this year.

But the 58-year-old is now leading House Republicans in the high-wire act of his career: Having negotiated with Democratic President Joe Biden over raising the nation’s debt limit, he now must deliver the votes to pass the spending cuts package into law.

The standoff is being watched the world over as the United States stares down a June 5 deadline when it could run short of cash to pay its bills, potentially hurling the American economy into chaos with an unprecedented default and taking the global economy into a crisis.

McCarthy commands only a slim majority in the House and must reach out to Democrats to support the compromise. But neither side is expected to be happy with the deal announced late Saturday.

If McCarthy succeeds in pushing the budget-cutting deal through Congress, it will be an accomplishment like nothing he has achieved before. Or he could lose it all, if the compromise he reached with the Democratic White House becomes so objectionable to the conservative flank that Republicans try to oust him from his job.

“One thing you’ve always learned about me: I don’t give up it,” McCarthy told reporters as he arrived at the Capitol on Saturday morning.

“Doesn’t matter how many times it takes,” he went on, “you want to make sure you get an agreement worthy of the American public.”

Throughout the weeks of grueling negotiations McCarthy has remained relentlessly optimistic, breezing through the anxiety-filled hours, seemingly certain of the outcome.

Underestimated from the start, he is nothing if not relentless. To become speaker, McCarthy endured 14 failed votes before finally securing the gavel on the 15th try, only after he had tired his colleagues out and given hard-right conservatives all sorts of promises and concessions.

McCarthy isn’t known as a seasoned legislator, one who has delved deeply into policy details or put his name on many big bills.

Having arrived in Congress in 2007, he rose swiftly to leadership as a political strategist, not a policy wonk.

Younger than the previous generation of congressional leaders, McCarthy is decades younger than Biden. The president has been in elected office since McCarthy was a young man growing up in dusty Bakersfield, running a sandwich shop counter from his uncle’s yogurt shop and becoming immersed in Reagan-era politics.

The White House refused initially to engage with McCarthy over the debt ceiling, insisting the Congress must simply do its job, raise the nation’s debt limit and skip the political brinksmanship.

Powered by a hard-right flank, McCarthy was determined to extract federal spending cuts to programs many Americans rely on in exchange for the votes in Congress needed to raise the nation’s debt limit.

McCarthy laid down a marker in his first meeting with Biden back in February. The new Republican speaker refused to raise any taxes to help offset federal deficits, including Biden’s proposals to roll back some of the Trump-era tax breaks for the wealthiest Americans and corporations.

The White House ultimately relented on negotiating with McCarthy after he pushed the GOP’s preferred debt-ceiling plan through the House, uniting his majority for the talks to come.

Democrats argue the showdown over the debt limit should not be the new normal way of doing the nation’s business.

Despite pleas from progressives, Biden has been reluctant to invoke powers under the 14th Amendment to raise the borrowing capacity on his own, unconvinced of its legal soundness.

The debt ceiling fight is not one that Congress needs to take on, and historically it was rarely like this. Often a routine endeavor, the vote to lift the debt limit, now $31 trillion, would allow the Treasury Department to keep paying the bills without any risk of default, ensuring America’s standing as the world economy with the most trusted currency.

Once Republicans seized power in the House during last year’s midterm elections it was almost certain a debt ceiling showdown would land at Biden’s doorstep. It was that way the last time Republicans swept into power, in 2011, on the tea party wave that launched the new era of brinksmanship in Washington, using the debt ceiling as leverage.

But these showdowns have tested GOP leaders as well, bedeviling past Republican speakers unable to fully satisfy the party’s increasingly conservative wing.

The hard-right House Freedom Caucus chased one former speaker, John Boehner, to early retirement. Another speaker, Paul Ryan, left office after a short term.

To become speaker, McCarthy worked hard to appeal to those same forces, agreeing to revive a House rule that allows any single member to call for a vote to oust the speaker. Forcing him from office would require a majority vote.

That threat hangs over McCarthy at every step as he tries to manage a debt ceiling deal.

Conservative Rep. Dan Bishop, R-N.C., warned in a tweet Saturday, before the deal was announced, that if the speaker brought back a “clean” debt ceiling increase, meaning one lacking the party priorities, “it’s war.”

But even if conservatives grow frustrated with McCarthy, he still has one important voice in his corner: former President Donald Trump.

As one of the earliest backers of Trump’s first White House bid, McCarthy has tried to stay close to Trump despite their on-again, off-again relationship. He said they spoke in recent days and Trump told him, “Make sure you get a good agreement.”

__

Associated Press writers Stephen Groves, Mary Clare Jalonick, Kevin Freking and Farnoush Amiri contributed to this report.

The post Debt ceiling tests Speaker McCarthy as he rides breezily through high-wire act of his career appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
]]>
Biden, GOP reach debt-ceiling deal, now Congress must approve it to prevent calamitous default https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/biden-gop-reach-debt-ceiling-deal-now-congress-must-approve-it-to-prevent-calamitous-default-2/ Sun, 28 May 2023 11:38:25 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/biden-gop-reach-debt-ceiling-deal-now-congress-must-approve-it-to-prevent-calamitous-default-2/

By LISA MASCARO, MARY CLARE JALONICK, ZEKE MILLER and KEVIN FREKING Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — An “agreement in principle” between President Joe Biden and House Speaker Kevin McCarthy would raise the nation’s legal debt ceiling, but now Congress has only days to approve a package that includes spending cuts and would avert a potentially

The post Biden, GOP reach debt-ceiling deal, now Congress must approve it to prevent calamitous default appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

By LISA MASCARO, MARY CLARE JALONICK, ZEKE MILLER and KEVIN FREKING
Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — An “agreement in principle” between President Joe Biden and House Speaker Kevin McCarthy would raise the nation’s legal debt ceiling, but now Congress has only days to approve a package that includes spending cuts and would avert a potentially disastrous U.S. default.

The compromise announced late Saturday risks angering both Democratic and Republican lawmakers as they begin to unpack the concessions. Negotiators agreed to some Republican demands for increased work requirements for recipients of food stamps that House Democrats had called a nonstarter. But bargainers stopped short of greater spending cuts overall that Republicans wanted.

Support from both parties will be needed to win congressional approval before a projected June 5 government default on U.S. debts. Lawmakers are not expected to return to work from the Memorial Day weekend before Tuesday, at the earliest, and McCarthy has promised lawmakers he will abide by the rule to post any bill for 72 hours before voting.

White House officials planned to brief House Democrats on a video call Sunday.

The Democratic president and Republican speaker reached the agreement after the two spoke Saturday evening by phone. The country and the world have been watching and waiting for a resolution to a political standoff that threatened the U.S. and global economies.

“The agreement represents a compromise, which means not everyone gets what they want,” Biden said in a statement. “That’s the responsibility of governing.”

Biden said the deal was “good news for the American people because it prevents what could have been a catastrophic default and would have led to an economic recession, retirement accounts devastated, and millions of jobs lost.”

McCarthy, in brief remarks at the Capitol, said that “we still have a lot of work to do.”

But he added: “I believe this is an agreement in principle that’s worthy of the American people.”

With the outlines of an agreement in place, the legislative package could be drafted and shared with lawmakers in time for House votes as soon as Wednesday, and later in the coming week in the Senate.

Central to the compromise is a two-year budget deal that would hold spending flat for 2024 and increase it by 1% for 2025 in exchange for raising the debt limit for two years, which would push the volatile political issue past the next presidential election.

Driving hard for a deal to impose tougher work requirements on government aid recipients, Republicans achieved some but not all of what they wanted. The agreement would raise the age for existing work requirements on able-bodied adults, from 49 to 54, without children. Biden was able to secure waivers for veterans and the homeless.

The two sides had also reached for an ambitious overhaul of federal permitting to ease development of energy projects. Instead, the agreement would put in place changes in the landmark National Environmental Policy Act that will designate “a single lead agency” to develop environmental reviews, in hopes of streamlining the process.

The deal came together after Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen told Congress that the United States could default on its debt obligations by June 5 — four days later than previously estimated — if lawmakers did not act in time. Lifting he nation’s debt limit, now at $31 trillion, allows more borrowing to pay the nation’s already incurred bills.

McCarthy commands only a slim Republican majority in the House, where hard-right conservatives may resist any deal as insufficient as they try to slash spending. By compromising with Democrats for votes, he risks losing support from his own rank and file, setting up a career-challenging moment for the new speaker.

Both sides have suggested one of the main holdups was a GOP effort to expand work requirements for recipients of food stamps and other federal aid programs, a longtime Republican goal that Democrats have strenuously opposed. The White House said the Republican proposals were “cruel and senseless.”

Biden has said the work requirements for Medicaid would be a nonstarter. He had seemed potentially open to negotiating changes on food stamps, now known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, despite objections from rank-and-file Democrats.

Americans and the world were uneasily watching the negotiating brinkmanship that threatened to throw the U.S. and global economy into chaos and sap world confidence in the nation’s leadership.

Anxious retirees and others were already making contingency plans for missed checks, with the next Social Security payments due next week.

Yellen said failure to act by the new date would “cause severe hardship to American families, harm our global leadership position and raise questions about our ability to defend our national security interests.”

___

Associated Press writers Stephen Groves, Fatima Hussein, Farnoush Amiri, Seung Min Kim and video journalist Rick Gentilo contributed to this report.

The post Biden, GOP reach debt-ceiling deal, now Congress must approve it to prevent calamitous default appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
]]>
Here’s what’s in the debt ceiling deal https://kesq.com/news/national-politics/cnn-us-politics/2023/05/28/heres-whats-in-the-debt-ceiling-deal-2/ https://kesq.com/news/national-politics/cnn-us-politics/2023/05/28/heres-whats-in-the-debt-ceiling-deal-2/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 10:59:06 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/heres-whats-in-the-debt-ceiling-deal-2/ CNN By Tami Luhby, CNN (CNN) — After several weeks of tense negotiations, President Joe Biden and House Republicans have reached an agreement in principle to raise the debt ceiling and cap spending. The drama is by no means over. Congressional leaders in both parties have to convince enough of their members to vote for

The post Here’s what’s in the debt ceiling deal appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

CNN

By Tami Luhby, CNN

(CNN) — After several weeks of tense negotiations, President Joe Biden and House Republicans have reached an agreement in principle to raise the debt ceiling and cap spending.

The drama is by no means over. Congressional leaders in both parties have to convince enough of their members to vote for the agreement, which contains provisions that lawmakers on each side of the aisle don’t support.

Not all the details of the agreement are available yet. And the information made public Saturday evening shows some discrepancies. The bill text is scheduled to be released on Sunday.

Here’s what we know about the deal, based on a fact sheet circulated by House Republicans and a source familiar with the negotiations.

Raises the debt ceiling: The agreement would increase the debt limit for two years.

Caps non-defense spending: Under the deal, non-defense spending would remain relatively flat in fiscal 2024 and increase by 1% in fiscal 2025, after certain unspecified adjustments to appropriations were made, according to the source.

After fiscal 2025, there would be appropriations targets, but they would not be enforceable, according to the source.

The House GOP fact sheet says that non-defense discretionary spending would be rolled back to fiscal 2022 levels and topline federal spending would be limited to 1% annual growth for the next six years.

The debt ceiling bill that House Republicans passed last month would return discretionary spending to fiscal 2022 levels and then limit the growth in spending to 1% for a decade. Defense spending would be protected.

Protects veterans’ medical care: The deal would maintain full funding for veterans’ health care and would increase support for the PACT Act’s toxic exposure fund by nearly $15 billion for fiscal year 2024, according to the source.

The House GOP fact sheet says veterans’ medical care would be fully funded.

Expands work requirements: The agreement calls for temporarily broadening of work requirements for certain adults receiving food stamps.

Currently, childless, able-bodied adults ages 18 to 49 are only able to get food stamps for three months out of every three years unless they are employed at least 20 hours a week or meet other criteria. The deal would raise the age to 54, according to the source. The GOP fact sheet says it would apply to those up to age 55.

However, the deal would also expand exemptions for veterans, people who are homeless and others in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, as food stamps are formally known.

And all the changes would end in 2030.

The agreement would also make changes to the current work requirements in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program.

Work requirements would not be introduced in Medicaid, which House Republicans had called for in their debt ceiling bill.

Claw back unspent Covid-19 relief funds: The deal would rescind unobligated funds from the Covid-19 relief packages that Congress passed to respond to the pandemic, according to the House GOP fact sheet.

Estimates on how much of the roughly $4.5 trillion in relief remains vary.

Cut Internal Revenue Service funding: The agreement would cancel the total fiscal year 2023 staffing funding request that the House GOP says would go for new IRS agents, according to the fact sheet.

House Republicans have been determined to cancel the roughly $80 billion in IRS funding contained in the Inflation Reduction Act that Democrats passed last year. The GOP lawmakers argue that the money will be used to hire an army of new agents to audit Americans, but the agency says it will also be used to support operations, modernize customer service technology and assist taxpayers.

Restart student loan repayments: The deal would require borrowers to pay back their student loans again, according to the House GOP fact sheet, although when repayments would start is not specified. They have been paused since the Covid-19 pandemic began.

However, the agreement would maintain Biden’s plan to provide up to $20,000 in debt relief for qualifying borrowers, the source said. The measure is currently before the Supreme Court, which is expected to rule on it in coming weeks.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

CNN’s Priscilla Alvarez, Alayna Treene and Lauren Fox contributed to this report.

The post Here’s what’s in the debt ceiling deal appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/news/national-politics/cnn-us-politics/2023/05/28/heres-whats-in-the-debt-ceiling-deal-2/feed/ 0 ]]>
Boston Celtics on verge of NBA history after dramatic buzzer-beating victory against Miami Heat forces Game 7 https://kesq.com/sports/national-sports/cnn-sports/2023/05/28/boston-celtics-on-verge-of-nba-history-after-dramatic-buzzer-beating-victory-against-miami-heat-forces-game-7/ https://kesq.com/sports/national-sports/cnn-sports/2023/05/28/boston-celtics-on-verge-of-nba-history-after-dramatic-buzzer-beating-victory-against-miami-heat-forces-game-7/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 10:45:53 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/boston-celtics-on-verge-of-nba-history-after-dramatic-buzzer-beating-victory-against-miami-heat-forces-game-7/ By Homero De la Fuente and Issy Ronald, CNN (CNN) — Boston Celtics guard Derrick White scored a miraculous putback to beat the buzzer and seal a dramatic 104-103 victory over the Miami Heat in Game 6 of the Eastern Conference Finals on Saturday. The Celtics’ unlikely victory erased a 0-3 series deficit and left

The post Boston Celtics on verge of NBA history after dramatic buzzer-beating victory against Miami Heat forces Game 7 appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
By Homero De la Fuente and Issy Ronald, CNN

(CNN) — Boston Celtics guard Derrick White scored a miraculous putback to beat the buzzer and seal a dramatic 104-103 victory over the Miami Heat in Game 6 of the Eastern Conference Finals on Saturday.

The Celtics’ unlikely victory erased a 0-3 series deficit and left them on the verge of NBA history as no team (0-150) has ever won a playoff series after being 0-3 down.

Marcus Smart’s 27 foot three-point shot had bounced around the rim as the last dregs of time ticked away, before White appeared “like a flash of lightning,” as Jaylen Brown told reporters, got the rebound and made the putback.

The buzzer turned red as the ball fell through the net, requiring a review which confirmed that White had become just the second player in NBA history, after Michael Jordan’s “The Shot” in 1989, to score a buzzer-beater with his team trailing and facing elimination.

“It felt good. Everybody was asking me, did you get it off, and I was like, yeah, I think so, but it was so close, you never know,” White told reporters afterwards. “We’re just happy we won. However we got to get it done, we got it done, and now it’s on to Game 7.”

Miami initially overcame a nine point deficit with less than four minutes remaining and took the lead with just three seconds left on the clock when Jimmy Butler made three free throws, but the Celtics still weren’t quite finished.

Jayson Tatum added 31 points for the Celtics, while Brown and Smart added 26 and 24 respectively. Butler led the way for the Heat with 24 points but endured a difficult night.

“Basketball for you. Basketball at its finest,” Butler told reporters afterwards. “Very, very, very entertaining … we were in this same position last year. We can do it. I know that we will do it. We’ve got to go on the road and win in a very, very, very tough environment.”

Boston will now return home to TD Garden for a winner-takes-all Game 7 on Monday, with the winner playing the Denver Nuggets in the NBA Finals, which tips off on June 1.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Boston Celtics on verge of NBA history after dramatic buzzer-beating victory against Miami Heat forces Game 7 appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/sports/national-sports/cnn-sports/2023/05/28/boston-celtics-on-verge-of-nba-history-after-dramatic-buzzer-beating-victory-against-miami-heat-forces-game-7/feed/ 0 ]]>
Última hora y noticias en vivo de la guerra de Rusia en Ucrania https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/ultima-hora-y-noticias-en-vivo-de-la-guerra-de-rusia-en-ucrania-48/ https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/ultima-hora-y-noticias-en-vivo-de-la-guerra-de-rusia-en-ucrania-48/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 10:42:23 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/ultima-hora-y-noticias-en-vivo-de-la-guerra-de-rusia-en-ucrania-48/ Gonzalo Jimenez 🔄 Haz clic aquí para ver las entradas más recientes The-CNN-Wire™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Última hora y noticias en vivo de la guerra de Rusia en Ucrania appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
Gonzalo Jimenez

🔄 Haz clic aquí para ver las entradas más recientes

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Última hora y noticias en vivo de la guerra de Rusia en Ucrania appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/ultima-hora-y-noticias-en-vivo-de-la-guerra-de-rusia-en-ucrania-48/feed/ 0 ]]>
Asiana Airlines suspende la venta de algunos asientos en salidas de emergencia tras el incidente de la puerta del avión https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/asiana-airlines-suspende-la-venta-de-algunos-asientos-en-salidas-de-emergencia-tras-el-incidente-de-la-puerta-del-avion/ https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/asiana-airlines-suspende-la-venta-de-algunos-asientos-en-salidas-de-emergencia-tras-el-incidente-de-la-puerta-del-avion/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 10:15:17 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/asiana-airlines-suspende-la-venta-de-algunos-asientos-en-salidas-de-emergencia-tras-el-incidente-de-la-puerta-del-avion/ Gonzalo Jimenez (CNN) — Asiana Airlines suspendió la venta de algunos asientos de salida de emergencia de aviones A321-200, según informó la compañía este domingo, tras un reciente incidente en el que un hombre abrió la puerta de un avión en pleno vuelo. A partir de este domingo, Asiana Airlines suspendió la venta del asiento

The post Asiana Airlines suspende la venta de algunos asientos en salidas de emergencia tras el incidente de la puerta del avión appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
Gonzalo Jimenez

(CNN) — Asiana Airlines suspendió la venta de algunos asientos de salida de emergencia de aviones A321-200, según informó la compañía este domingo, tras un reciente incidente en el que un hombre abrió la puerta de un avión en pleno vuelo.

A partir de este domingo, Asiana Airlines suspendió la venta del asiento 26A de 11 aviones A321-200, que operan con 174 plazas, y la del asiento 31A de tres aviones A321-200, que operan con 195 plazas, informó la aerolínea en un comunicado.

“Esta medida es una precaución de seguridad y se aplica incluso si el vuelo está completo”, añadió.

Momentos de terror en un avión de Asiana Airlines: la puerta se abrió mientras seguía en el aire

Un hombre abrió la puerta de emergencia de un avión de Asiana Airlines justo antes de aterrizar el viernes por la tarde. Un funcionario de la aerolínea dijo que un hombre de unos 30 años que estaba sentado en el asiento de emergencia parecía haber abierto la puerta.

Un total de 200 personas iban a bordo, entre ellas 194 pasajeros, según Asiana Airlines. El avión fue identificado en el sitio web de seguimiento Flightradar 24 como un Airbus 321.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Asiana Airlines suspende la venta de algunos asientos en salidas de emergencia tras el incidente de la puerta del avión appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/asiana-airlines-suspende-la-venta-de-algunos-asientos-en-salidas-de-emergencia-tras-el-incidente-de-la-puerta-del-avion/feed/ 0 ]]>
Jersey Shore town to crack down on the ‘mere existence of any kind of alcohol’ on beach and boardwalk https://kesq.com/news/national-world/cnn-national/2023/05/28/jersey-shore-town-to-crack-down-on-the-mere-existence-of-any-kind-of-alcohol-on-beach-and-boardwalk/ https://kesq.com/news/national-world/cnn-national/2023/05/28/jersey-shore-town-to-crack-down-on-the-mere-existence-of-any-kind-of-alcohol-on-beach-and-boardwalk/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 10:01:00 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/jersey-shore-town-to-crack-down-on-the-mere-existence-of-any-kind-of-alcohol-on-beach-and-boardwalk/ by Zenebou Sylla, CNN (CNN) — Officials in New Jersey are banning the possession of alcohol on a popular beach and boardwalk after city commissioners unanimously passed the “stricter” ordinance. Introduced during a Board of Commissioners meeting in Wildwood, New Jersey, in early May, the new ordinance “not only prohibits the drinking and/or open display

The post Jersey Shore town to crack down on the ‘mere existence of any kind of alcohol’ on beach and boardwalk appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
by Zenebou Sylla, CNN

(CNN) — Officials in New Jersey are banning the possession of alcohol on a popular beach and boardwalk after city commissioners unanimously passed the “stricter” ordinance.

Introduced during a Board of Commissioners meeting in Wildwood, New Jersey, in early May, the new ordinance “not only prohibits the drinking and/or open display of alcohol, but also says the mere existence of any kind of alcohol is prohibited,” Mayor Pete Byron said in a news release on Thursday.

“Alcohol of any kind has always been prohibited on the beach and boardwalk. In fact, there is already a sign at every street entrance to the beach,” he continued.

He told CNN the new ordinance was tweaked to include even the presence of alcohol on the beach and boardwalk in the town, some 40 miles south of Atlantic City.

Revelers over Memorial Day Weekend will be spared from enforcement, as the new ordinance doesn’t go into effect until mid-June. The mayor says the ordinance was passed on Wednesday and goes into effect after 20 days.

Those not abiding by the ordinance could walk off with a warning, a fine of up to $2,000 or potentially 90 days in jail, Mayor Byron told CNN.

The ordinance mirrors those in other shore towns, officials say, and seeks to “crack down” on the matter of possession, according to the news release.

It exempts designated restaurants or permitted events on the beach and boardwalk, according to the release.

Wildwood Deputy Mayor Krista Fitzsimons cited the numerous complaints about drinking, marijuana use and smoking on the beach and boardwalk received every year as part of the reason for the new ordinance.

“This is a matter of public safety,” Commissioner of Public Safety Steve Mikulski said in the release. “We understand people are on vacation and want to have a good time,” he continued.

“We want everyone to enjoy Wildwood. Drinking, especially in the sun on vacation, often leads to excess and unruly behavior, not to mention increased health risks.”

Wildwood is composed of five separate municipalities consisting of Wildwood, North and West Wildwood, Wildwood Crest, and Diamond Beach, according to the Wildwood, New Jersey website.

In the same release, officials say a “breach of peace” ordinance was also approved “to help the police crack down on juvenile curfew violations, excessive noise, littering, vandalism, setting off illegal fireworks and riding bikes on the boardwalk after hours, among other complaints.”

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Jersey Shore town to crack down on the ‘mere existence of any kind of alcohol’ on beach and boardwalk appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/news/national-world/cnn-national/2023/05/28/jersey-shore-town-to-crack-down-on-the-mere-existence-of-any-kind-of-alcohol-on-beach-and-boardwalk/feed/ 0 ]]>
Warm and windy conditions continue https://kesq.com/weather/2023/05/28/warm-and-windy-conditions-continue/ https://kesq.com/weather/2023/05/28/warm-and-windy-conditions-continue/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 09:52:53 +0000 https://kesq.com/?p=1180714

Conditions will take on a similar pattern to yesterday as winds weaken this morning and pick back up in the evening. Blustery west winds are expected to exceed 30-40 mph near wind prone areas like the San Gorgonio pass and could be as high as 25 mph in other valley areas. Wind will remain through

The post Warm and windy conditions continue appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

Conditions will take on a similar pattern to yesterday as winds weaken this morning and pick back up in the evening. Blustery west winds are expected to exceed 30-40 mph near wind prone areas like the San Gorgonio pass and could be as high as 25 mph in other valley areas.

Wind will remain through Memorial Day, namely during the evening hours once again, but calmer conditions are expected by Tuesday. Although windy conditions will persist through the holiday weekend, there are currently no watches or warnings posted.

If you're okay with some wind, it is still a great time to head outdoors this weekend! The low pressure system that ushered in the wind to the valley this weekend has also kept conditions dry and slightly below the seasonal average (98°).

Temperatures will remain in the mid to low 90s for most of the upcoming work week before pushing back towards the high 90s for the weekend.

The post Warm and windy conditions continue appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/weather/2023/05/28/warm-and-windy-conditions-continue/feed/ 0 ]]>
Voters in Turkey choose between Erdogan and Kilicdaroglu in presidential runoff https://kesq.com/news/ap-national-business/2023/05/28/voters-in-turkey-choose-between-erdogan-and-kilicdaroglu-in-presidential-runoff/ Sun, 28 May 2023 09:52:50 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/voters-in-turkey-choose-between-erdogan-and-kilicdaroglu-in-presidential-runoff/

By SUZAN FRASER and ZEYNEP BILGINSOY Associated Press ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Voters in Turkey returned to the polls Sunday to decide whether the country’s longtime leader stretches his increasingly authoritarian rule into a third decade, or is unseated by a challenger who has promised to restore a more democratic society. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan,

The post Voters in Turkey choose between Erdogan and Kilicdaroglu in presidential runoff appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

By SUZAN FRASER and ZEYNEP BILGINSOY
Associated Press

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Voters in Turkey returned to the polls Sunday to decide whether the country’s longtime leader stretches his increasingly authoritarian rule into a third decade, or is unseated by a challenger who has promised to restore a more democratic society.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has been at Turkey’s helm for 20 years, is favored to win a new five-year term in the second-round runoff, after coming just short of outright victory in the first round on May 14.

The divisive populist finished four percentage points ahead of Kemal Kilicdaroglu, the candidate of a six-party alliance and leader of Turkey’s center-left main opposition party. Erdogan’s performance came despite crippling inflation and the effects of a devastating earthquake three months ago.

The final decision could have implications far beyond Ankara. Turkey stands at the crossroads of Europe and Asia, and it plays a key role in NATO.

Erdogan’s government vetoed Sweden’s bid to join NATO and purchased Russian missile-defense systems, which prompted the United States to oust Turkey from a U.S.-led fighter-jet project. But it also helped broker a crucial deal that allowed Ukrainian grain shipments and averted a global food crisis.

The two candidates offered sharply different visions of the country’s future, and its recent past.

“This election took place under very difficult circumstances, there was all sorts of slander and defamation,” the 74-year-old Kilicdaroglu (pronounced KEH-lich-DAHR-OH-loo) told reporters after casting his ballot. “But I trust in the common sense of the people. Democracy will come, freedom will come, people will be able to wander the streets and freely criticize politicians.”

Speaking to reporters after casting his vote at a school in Istanbul, Erdogan noted that it’s the first presidential runoff election in Turkey’s history. He also praised high voter turnout in the first round and said he expected participation to be high again on Sunday. He voted at the same time as Kilicdaroglu, as local television showed the rivals casting ballots on split screens.

“I pray to God, that it (the election) will be beneficial for our country and nation,” he said.

More than 64 million people are eligible to cast ballots. The polls opened at 8 a.m.

Turkey does not have exit polls, but preliminary results are expected to come within hours of the polls closing at 5 p.m.

Critics blame Erdogan’s unconventional economic policies for skyrocketing inflation that has fueled a cost-of-living crisis. Many also faulted his government for a slow response to the earthquake that killed more than 50,000 people in Turkey.

In the mainly Kurdish-populated province of Diyarbakir — one of 11 regions that was hit by the Feb. 6 earthquake — 60-year-old retiree Mustafa Yesil said he voted for “change.”

“I’m not happy at all with the way this country is going. Let me be clear, if this current administration continues, I don’t see good things for the future,” he said. “I see that it will end badly — this administration has to change.”

Mehmet Yurttas, an Erdogan supporter, disagreed.

“I believe that our homeland is at the peak, in a very good condition,” the 57-year-old shop owner said. “Our country’s trajectory is very good and it will continue being good.”

Erdogan has retained the backing of conservative voters who remain devoted to him for lifting Islam’s profile in the Turkey, which was founded on secular principles, and for raising the country’s influence in world politics.

If he wins, Erdogan, 69, could remain in power until 2028. Erdogan is already Turkey’s longest-serving leader. A devout Muslim, he heads the conservative and religious Justice and Development Party, or AKP. Erdogan transformed the presidency from a largely ceremonial role to a powerful office through a narrowly won 2017 referendum that scrapped Turkey’s parliamentary system of governance. He was the first directly elected president in 2014, and won the 2018 election that ushered in the executive presidency.

The first half of Erdogan’s tenure included reforms that allowed the country to begin talks to join the European Union, and economic growth that lifted many out of poverty. But he later moved to suppress freedoms and the media and concentrated more power in his own hands, especially after a failed coup attempt that Turkey says was orchestrated by the U.S.-based Islamic cleric Fethullah Gulen. The cleric denies involvement.

Erdogan’s rival is a soft-mannered former civil servant who has led the pro-secular Republican People’s Party, or CHP, since 2010. Kilicdaroglu campaigned on promises to reverse Erdogan’s democratic backsliding, to restore the economy by reverting to more conventional policies, and to improve ties with the West.

In a frantic effort to reach out to nationalist voters in the runoff, Kilicdaroglu vowed to send back refugees and ruled out peace negotiations with Kurdish militants if he is elected.

A defeat for Kilicdaroglu would add to a long list of electoral losses to Erdogan, and put pressure on him to step down as party chairman.

Erdogan’s AKP party and its allies retained a majority of seats in parliament following a legislative election that was also held on May 14. Parliamentary elections will not be repeated Sunday.

Erdogan’s party also dominated in the earthquake-hit region, winning 10 out of 11 provinces in an area that has traditionally supported the president. Erdogan came in ahead in the presidential race in eight of those provinces.

Sunday also marks the 10th anniversary of the start of mass anti-government protests that broke out over plans to uproot trees in Istanbul’s Gezi Park, and became one of the most serious challenges to Erdogan’s government.

Erdogan’s response to the protests, in which eight people were convicted for alleged involvement, was a harbinger of a crackdown on civil society and freedom of expression.

Following the May 14 vote, international observers pointed to the criminalization of dissemination of false information and online censorship as evidence that Erdogan had an “unjustified advantage.” They also said that strong turnout showed the resilience of Turkish democracy.

Erdogan and pro-government media portrayed Kilicdaroglu, who received the backing of the country’s pro-Kurdish party, as colluding with “terrorists” and of supporting what they described as “deviant” LGBTQ rights.

Kilicdaroglu “receives his orders from Qandil,” Erdogan repeatedly said at recent campaign rallies, a reference to the mountains in Iraq where the leadership of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK, is based.

The election was held as the country marked the 100th anniversary of its establishment as a republic, following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire.

___

Zeynep Bilginsoy reported from Istanbul. Mucahit Ceylan contributed from Diyarbakir, Turkey and Cinar Kiper contributed from Bodrum, Turkey.

The post Voters in Turkey choose between Erdogan and Kilicdaroglu in presidential runoff appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
]]>
Modi opponents boycott opening of new Indian Parliament; PM says it breaks with colonial past https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/modi-opponents-boycott-opening-of-new-indian-parliament-pm-says-it-breaks-with-colonial-past/ Sun, 28 May 2023 09:17:59 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/modi-opponents-boycott-opening-of-new-indian-parliament-pm-says-it-breaks-with-colonial-past/

By SHEIKH SAALIQ Associated Press NEW DELHI (AP) — India’s major opposition parties on Sunday boycotted the inauguration of a new Parliament building by Prime Minister Narendra Modi in a rare show of unity against his Hindu nationalist ruling party, which has ruled for nine years and is seeking a third term in next year’s

The post Modi opponents boycott opening of new Indian Parliament; PM says it breaks with colonial past appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

By SHEIKH SAALIQ
Associated Press

NEW DELHI (AP) — India’s major opposition parties on Sunday boycotted the inauguration of a new Parliament building by Prime Minister Narendra Modi in a rare show of unity against his Hindu nationalist ruling party, which has ruled for nine years and is seeking a third term in next year’s elections.

Modi inaugurated the new Parliament in the capital of New Delhi by offering prayers as Hindu priests chanted religious hymns. Opposition parties criticized the event saying Modi had sidelined President Droupadi Murmu, who has only ceremonial powers but is the head of state and highest constitutional authority.

Shortly after the inauguration, a visibly beaming Modi entered Parliament amid a rousing applause by his party lawmakers who chanted “Modi, Modi.” He delivered an almost 40-minute speech in which he hailed India’s parliamentary democracy and said the country had left behind its colonial past, referring to the old Parliament building that was built by the British when they ruled India.

“India is the mother of democracy,” Modi said, as lawmakers thumped their desks. “Several years of foreign rule stole our pride from us. Today, India has left behind that colonial mindset.”

The opposition Congress party leader Rahul Gandhi tweeted: “Parliament is the voice of the people. The Prime Minister is considering the inauguration of the Parliament House as a coronation.”

At least 19 opposition parties skipped the event, which coincided with the birth anniversary of a Hindu nationalist ideologue.

Opposition parties said in a statement Wednesday that Modi’s decision to inaugurate the building was “a grave insult” to India’s democracy, because the government had “disqualified, suspended and muted” opposition lawmakers while passing “controversial legislation” with little debate.

“When the soul of democracy has been sucked out from the parliament, we find no value in a new building,” the parties said.

India’s powerful Home Minister Amit Shah said the opposition had politicized the event. Other leaders from Modi’s party said the boycott was an insult to the prime minister.

The new triangular-shaped building — built at an estimated cost of $120 million — is part of a $2.8 billion revamp of British-era offices and residences in central New Delhi that will also include blocks of buildings to house government ministries and departments, and Modi’s new private residence. The entire project, called the “Central Vista,” is spread over 3.2 kilometers (1.9 miles).

The project was announced in 2019, and Modi laid the foundation in December 2020.

The plan has drawn intense criticism from opposition politicians, architects and heritage experts, many of whom called it environmentally irresponsible, a threat to cultural heritage and too expensive.

Outrage grew in 2021, when at least 12 opposition parties questioned the project’s timing, saying it was built as the country faced a devastating surge in coronavirus cases. They branded the revamp as Modi’s “vanity project” and said its construction was prioritized over the loss of lives and livelihoods during the pandemic.

A year earlier, a group of 60 former civil servants wrote an open letter to Modi to highlight the architectural value of the old Parliament and said the new plan would “irrevocably” destroy the area’s cultural heritage.

Modi’s government has said the overhaul was necessary because the older building was “showing signs of distress and overutilization” and that the new design “combines the country’s heritage and traditions.”

The new building sits just across from India’s old Parliament, a circular structure designed by British architects in the early 20th century. The new four-story building has a total of 1,272 seats in two chambers, almost 500 more than the previous one.

The old Parliament will be converted into a museum.

During the televised ceremony Sunday, Modi prostrated himself before a royal golden scepter that his Bharatiya Janata Party says symbolized the transfer of power when it was gifted to the country’s first prime minister on the eve of India’s independence from Britain in 1947. Dozens of Hindu priests followed Modi inside Parliament, where he installed the scepter near the chair of the speaker.

Modi’s critics and opposition leaders have questioned the scepter’s historicity and said the emblem is appropriate for a monarchy, not a democracy.

Last year, Modi inaugurated a refurbished colonial-era avenue in the heart of New Delhi that is used for ceremonial military parades. The boulevard was earlier called Rajpath, or Kingsway, but Modi’s party changed it to Kartavya Path, or Road to Duty, arguing the old name was a “symbol of slavery” that had been “erased forever.”

The controversy over the new legislative building comes just months after opposition leaders protested Gandhi’s disqualification from Parliament in a defamation case over remarks he made about Modi’s surname.

Barely a mile away from the ceremony, a heavy police presence overpowered about 100 protesting Indian wrestlers and their supporters. They accuse their federation president of sexual misconduct and had planned to march to the new Parliament building. Some of the protesters scuffled with police and were taken away in a bus.

Wrestling Federation of India President Brij Bhushan Sharan Singh, who has denied the accusations, is a powerful lawmaker from Modi’s party.

The post Modi opponents boycott opening of new Indian Parliament; PM says it breaks with colonial past appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
]]>
Higher mortgage rates, lower social security payments: The calamity Washington wants to avoid with a debt ceiling deal https://kesq.com/money/cnn-business-consumer/2023/05/28/this-is-the-calamity-washington-is-trying-to-avoid-with-a-debt-ceiling-deal/ https://kesq.com/money/cnn-business-consumer/2023/05/28/this-is-the-calamity-washington-is-trying-to-avoid-with-a-debt-ceiling-deal/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 09:00:27 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/this-is-the-calamity-washington-is-trying-to-avoid-with-a-debt-ceiling-deal/ By Samantha Delouya, CNN New York (CNN) — At long last, the White House and House Republicans have reached a tentative agreement to raise the debt ceiling. But a deal isn’t over yet: Congress still needs to vote on the deal – far from a guaranteed outcome – and President Joe Biden would need to

The post Higher mortgage rates, lower social security payments: The calamity Washington wants to avoid with a debt ceiling deal appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
By Samantha Delouya, CNN

New York (CNN) — At long last, the White House and House Republicans have reached a tentative agreement to raise the debt ceiling. But a deal isn’t over yet: Congress still needs to vote on the deal – far from a guaranteed outcome – and President Joe Biden would need to sign it before the US defaults or misses a scheduled payment.

Every day that passes without a bill to raise the debt ceiling, the probability of the United States reaching the critical date that it can no longer meet its financial obligations steadily grows.

If lawmakers fail to pass the tentative agreement, and they don’t raise the country’s debt limit by early June, the government may confront an unprecedented challenge: determining which bills to prioritize for payment as the Treasury Department grapples with insufficient funds.

Debt vs. other payments

If the United States doesn’t raise the debt ceiling in time, the Treasury may have to decide whether to make interest payments to its debtholders or to pay its non-debt obligations, such as Social Security, veterans’ benefits, unemployment insurance, food stamps, and running government organizations like the military and the US Centers for Disease Control.

The United States government makes millions of payments each day, but the overall economy would pay a far greater price if it were to miss payments on its debt, according to Mark Zandi, the chief economist at Moody’s Analytics. Moody’s Analytics is separate from Moody’s Investor Service, the credit rating agency.

If the United States defaults on its debt, it would undermine faith in the federal government’s ability to pay all its bills on time, affecting the government’s credit rating and unleashing massive turbulence in financial markets.

Countries with lower credit ratings face higher interest rate costs than those that are viewed as more trustworthy borrowers. The three largest credit rating agencies – Moody’s Investor Service, S&P Global Ratings, and Fitch Ratings – rate borrowers based on their perceived ability to pay back debt.

If America’s credit rating were downgraded, that could raise borrowing costs for millions of Americans, sending mortgage, personal loan and credit card rates higher. It could make business’ borrowing costs rise and lead to layoffs – and ultimately a recession.

What gets prioritized?

Absent a bill passed by Congress and signed by Biden, Treasury will likely do everything in its power to avoid a debt default.

In contrast to debt payments, government payments like Social Security or federal worker salaries aren’t considered debt instruments, so they are less likely to come into play when the agencies rate the United States’ debt.

Zandi acknowledged that a government decision to pay back bondholders, including foreign governments like China and Japan, over an elderly Social Security recipient will likely be politically unpopular. However, he believes the government would try to prevent a debt default for as long as it can.

“The reality is, if they don’t do that, then the economy is going to evaporate, the budget deficits are going to explode, and our interest expense is going to rise because investors are going to demand higher rates,” Zandi said.

“A grandmother 10 to 20 years from now looking for a Social Security check will be much less likely to get one. At least not one as large because we’ll be in a much more precarious financial situation.”

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen, however, has not said what the Treasury Department would do if the country hits the so-called X-date, when the government can no longer meet all its obligations. In March, she called prioritizing payments “effectively a default by just another name.”

Treasury will not be able to make everyone happy

On Friday, Yellen updated her estimate of the X-date, to June 5.

Though prioritizing debt payments might stave off an even-greater economic collapse, the United States may not emerge unscathed.

In 2011, then-Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner compared the government picking and choosing which bills to pay to a homeowner who pays their mortgage while pushing off their car loan and credit card bills: while that key housing expense is taken care of, that person would likely still have damaged credit.

Betsey Stevenson, a professor of economics and public policy at the University of Michigan, said no matter which payments Treasury decides to put first, the agency will likely be sued by those left behind.

“What should Treasury do? Should it issue new debt it’s not authorized to issue? Should it fail to pay a bill it’s required to pay? Should it fail to honor the debt that the US government has issued? There is no clear legal answer,” she said.

“Treasury doesn’t really want to answer that question, and they don’t really want to be in that position.”

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post Higher mortgage rates, lower social security payments: The calamity Washington wants to avoid with a debt ceiling deal appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/money/cnn-business-consumer/2023/05/28/this-is-the-calamity-washington-is-trying-to-avoid-with-a-debt-ceiling-deal/feed/ 0 ]]>
New Mexico mayor: shooting involving motorcycle gangs kills 3, wounds 5 at annual holiday rally https://kesq.com/news/ap-national-news/2023/05/28/new-mexico-mayor-shooting-involving-motorcycle-gangs-kills-3-wounds-5-at-annual-holiday-rally/ Sun, 28 May 2023 08:53:00 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/new-mexico-mayor-shooting-involving-motorcycle-gangs-kills-3-wounds-5-at-annual-holiday-rally/

RED RIVER, N.M. (AP) — Three people were killed and five were wounded in a shooting at an annual motorcycle rally in a New Mexico town late Saturday afternoon, the mayor said. Red River Mayor Linda Calhoun said in a video posted on Facebook that the shooting around 5 p.m. resulted in three fatalities and

The post New Mexico mayor: shooting involving motorcycle gangs kills 3, wounds 5 at annual holiday rally appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

RED RIVER, N.M. (AP) — Three people were killed and five were wounded in a shooting at an annual motorcycle rally in a New Mexico town late Saturday afternoon, the mayor said.

Red River Mayor Linda Calhoun said in a video posted on Facebook that the shooting around 5 p.m. resulted in three fatalities and five victims were transported to hospitals in Denver, Albuquerque and nearby Taos.

The 41st annual Red River Memorial Motorcycle Rally drew about 20,000 bikers to the town, Calhoun said.

The violence occurred between two retail stores and involved members of motorcycle gangs, Calhoun said.

“The shooters have all been apprehended,” she said. “There is no threat to the community at all.”

The New Mexico State Police previously said in a Twitter post that two people were killed and six were wounded in the shooting.

Most of Main Street in Red River, where the shooting occurred, was closed to the public for the investigation and law enforcement requested businesses in the area remain closed on Sunday, Calhoun said in a statement.

“Our number one priority is the safety and wellbeing of our local community,” Calhoun said. “We appreciate your cooperation and understanding as we work through this very difficult time together.”

Some of the victims were being treated at Holy Cross Hospital in Taos, about 36 miles (58 kilometers) southeast of Red River. The Taos Police Department and the Taos County Sheriff’s Office secured the hospital, the state police said on Twitter.

One victim was airlifted to a hospital in Denver, the state police said.

Victims also were transported to the University of New Mexico Hospital, which was secured by the Albuquerque Police Department, KRQE reported.

Taos Mayor Pascual Maestas issued an emergency proclamation placing the town under a curfew from 10 p.m. Saturday until 4 a.m. Sunday with an immediate prohibition on alcohol sales.

The post New Mexico mayor: shooting involving motorcycle gangs kills 3, wounds 5 at annual holiday rally appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
]]>
El papa Francisco se reunió con Martin Scorsese tras recuperarse de la fiebre https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/el-papa-francisco-se-reunio-con-martin-scorsese-tras-recuperarse-de-la-fiebre/ https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/el-papa-francisco-se-reunio-con-martin-scorsese-tras-recuperarse-de-la-fiebre/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 08:42:15 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/el-papa-francisco-se-reunio-con-martin-scorsese-tras-recuperarse-de-la-fiebre/ Gonzalo Jimenez Roma (CNN) — El papa Francisco pronunció el sábado un discurso en una conferencia a la que asistieron destacados artistas y directores, entre ellos Martin Scorsese, un día después de que cancelara su agenda habitual de trabajo debido a una fiebre. De vuelta a sus obligaciones el sábado, Francisco pronunció un discurso en

The post El papa Francisco se reunió con Martin Scorsese tras recuperarse de la fiebre appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
Gonzalo Jimenez

Roma (CNN) — El papa Francisco pronunció el sábado un discurso en una conferencia a la que asistieron destacados artistas y directores, entre ellos Martin Scorsese, un día después de que cancelara su agenda habitual de trabajo debido a una fiebre.

De vuelta a sus obligaciones el sábado, Francisco pronunció un discurso en el evento en el Vaticano, que se llamó “La estética global de la imaginación católica”, informó Vatican News.

Hablando de su amor por la literatura, dijo, según el título: “Las palabras de esos autores me ayudaron a comprenderme a mí mismo, al mundo y a mi pueblo, pero también a comprender más profundamente el corazón humano, mi vida personal de fe y mi trabajo pastoral, incluso ahora en mi ministerio actual”.

El papa Francisco cancela sus audiencias por fiebre, dice el Vaticano

Añadió que “ha amado a muchos poetas a lo largo de su vida” y que aprendió literatura de joven.

El galardonado director de cine Martin Scorsese y su familia se encontraban entre el público de escritores internacionales, poetas y otros artistas en la conferencia.

Scorsese conoció al papa Francisco en 2016, cuando ambos mantuvieron una audiencia privada para hablar de su película “Silencio”, sobre los cristianos perseguidos en el Japón del siglo XVII.

A principios de esta semana, Francisco se vio afectado por una fiebre que le obligó a cancelar sus compromisos de trabajo el viernes y desató nuevas preocupaciones por su salud.

El papa Francisco se reúne con funcionarios durante la conferencia del sábado (Crédito: Vatican Media/Handout/Reuters)

Sin embargo, la agenda de citas diarias enviada por el Vaticano el sábado mostraba que Francisco reanudaba su trabajo. El Vaticano no emitió ninguna nueva actualización sobre la salud del pontífice de 86 años.

Se espera que Francisco celebre la misa de Pentecostés en la Plaza de San Pedro este domingo.

El secretario de Estado del Vaticano, el cardenal Pietro Parolin, dijo el jueves que Francisco estaba “cansado” después de un “día muy intenso”, según la agencia de noticias italiana ANSA.

“El Papa estaba cansado. Ayer tuvo un día muy intenso y vio a mucha gente. Estaba el encuentro con Scholas Occurrentes y quiso saludar a cada persona individualmente. A un cierto punto, uno se vuelve menos resistente”, dijo Parolin.

¿Qué problemas de salud ha tenido el papa Francisco?

Francisco fue visto con buen aspecto el jueves por la tarde en un evento transmitido en directo desde el Vaticano para Scholas Occurrentes, una red internacional de educación que él fundó, según el equipo de CNN sobre el terreno.

Fue hospitalizado en marzo por una bronquitis, pero respondió bien a los antibióticos.

Al salir del hospital en esa ocasión, el Papa bromeó diciendo que “sigue vivo”.

El pontífice –que de joven sufrió una grave neumonía y le extirparon parte de un pulmón– ha tenido un historial reciente de problemas médicos.

A menudo se le ha visto con un bastón y a veces utiliza una silla de ruedas debido a dolores en su rodilla derecha.

El año pasado, canceló un viaje a la República Democrática del Congo (RDC) y a Sudán del Sur después de que los médicos le dijeran que podría perderse también un viaje posterior a Canadá a menos que accediera a someterse a 20 días más de terapia y reposo para su rodilla. Finalmente viajó a la RDC y a Sudán del Sur en febrero.

Francisco también padece la enfermedad diverticular, una afección común que puede causar la inflamación o infección del colon. En 2021 le operaron para extirparle parte del colon.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post El papa Francisco se reunió con Martin Scorsese tras recuperarse de la fiebre appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/kunamundo/noticias-cnn/cnn-spanish/2023/05/28/el-papa-francisco-se-reunio-con-martin-scorsese-tras-recuperarse-de-la-fiebre/feed/ 0 ]]>
Voters in Turkey choose between Erdogan and Kilicdaroglu in presidential runoff election https://kesq.com/news/ap-national-business/2023/05/28/voters-in-turkey-choose-between-erdogan-and-kilicdaroglu-in-presidential-runoff-election/ Sun, 28 May 2023 08:27:47 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/voters-in-turkey-choose-between-erdogan-and-kilicdaroglu-in-presidential-runoff-election/

By SUZAN FRASER and ZEYNEP BILGINSOY Associated Press ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Voters in Turkey returned to the polls Sunday to decide whether the country’s longtime leader stretches his increasingly authoritarian rule into a third decade or is unseated by a challenger who has promised to restore a more democratic society. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan,

The post Voters in Turkey choose between Erdogan and Kilicdaroglu in presidential runoff election appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

By SUZAN FRASER and ZEYNEP BILGINSOY
Associated Press

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Voters in Turkey returned to the polls Sunday to decide whether the country’s longtime leader stretches his increasingly authoritarian rule into a third decade or is unseated by a challenger who has promised to restore a more democratic society.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has been at Turkey’s helm for 20 years, is favored to win a new five-year term in the second-round runoff after coming just short of an outright victory in the first round on May 14.

The divisive populist who turned his country into a geopolitical player finished four percentage points ahead of Kemal Kilicdaroglu, the candidate of a six-party alliance and leader of Turkey’s center-left main opposition party. Erdogan’s performance came despite crippling inflation and the effects of a devastating earthquake three months ago.

Kilicdaroglu (pronounced KEH-lich-DAHR-OH-loo), a 74-year-old former bureaucrat, has described the runoff as a referendum on the country’s future.

More than 64 million people are eligible to cast ballots. The polls opened at 8 a.m.

Turkey does not have exit polls, but the preliminary results are expected to come within hours of the polls closing at 5 p.m.

The final decision could have implications far beyond Ankara because Turkey stands at the crossroads of Europe and Asia, and it plays a key role in NATO.

Turkey vetoed Sweden’s bid to join the alliance and purchased Russian missile-defense systems, which prompted the United States to oust Turkey from a U.S.-led fighter-jet project. But Erdogan’s government also helped broker a crucial deal that allowed Ukrainian grain shipments and averted a global food crisis.

The May 14 election saw 87% turnout, and strong participation is expected again Sunday, reflecting voters’ devotion to elections in a country where freedom of expression and assembly have been suppressed.

In the mainly-Kurdish populated province of Diyarbakir — one of 11 regions that was hit by the Feb. 6 earthquake — 60-year-old retiree Mustafa Yesil said he voted for “change.”

“I’m not happy at all with the way this country is going. Let me be clear, if this current administration continues, I don’t see good things for the future,” he said. “I see that it will end badly — this administration has to change.”

But Mehmet Yurttas, an Erdogan supporter, disagreed.

“I believe that our homeland is at the peak, in a very good condition,” the 57-year-old shop owner said. “Our country’s trajectory is very good and it will continue being good.”

If he wins, Erdogan, 69, could remain in power until 2028. After three stints as prime minister and two as president, the devout Muslim who heads the conservative and religious Justice and Development Party, or AKP, is already Turkey’s longest-serving leader.

The first half of Erdogan’s tenure included reforms that allowed the country to begin talks to join the European Union and economic growth that lifted many out of poverty. But he later moved to suppress freedoms and the media and concentrated more power in his hands, especially after a failed coup attempt that Turkey says was orchestrated by the U.S.-based Islamic cleric Fethullah Gulen. The cleric denies involvement.

Erdogan transformed the presidency from a largely ceremonial role to a powerful office through a narrowly won 2017 referendum that scrapped Turkey’s parliamentary system of governance. He was the first directly elected president in 2014 and won the 2018 election that ushered in the executive presidency.

The May 14 election was the first that Erdogan did not win outright.

Critics blame Erdogan’s unconventional economic policies for skyrocketing inflation that has fueled a cost-of-living crisis. Many also faulted his government for the slow response to the earthquake that killed more than 50,000 people in Turkey.

Still, Erdogan has retained the backing of conservative voters who remain devoted to him for lifting Islam’s profile in the country that was founded on secular principles and for raising the country’s influence in world politics.

In a bid to woo voters hit hard by inflation, he has increased wages and pensions and subsidized electricity and gas bills, while showcasing Turkey’s homegrown defense industry and infrastructure projects. He also centered his reelection campaign on a promise to rebuild quake-stricken areas, including constructing 319,000 homes within the year. Many see him as a source of stability.

Kilicdaroglu is a soft-mannered former civil servant who has led the pro-secular Republican People’s Party, or CHP, since 2010. He campaigned on a promise to reverse Erdogan’s democratic backsliding, restore the economy by reverting to more conventional policies and to improve ties with the West.

In a frantic do-or-die effort to reach out to nationalist voters in the runoff, Kilicdaroglu vowed to send back refugees and ruled out any peace negotiations with Kurdish militants if he is elected.

Many in Turkey regard Syrian refugees who have been under Turkey’s temporary protection after fleeing the war in neighboring Syria as a burden on the country, and their repatriation became a key issue in the election.

Earlier in the week, Erdogan received the endorsement of third-place candidate, nationalist politician Sinan Ogan, who garnered 5.2% of the votes and is no longer in the race. Meanwhile, a staunchly anti-migrant party that had supported Ogan’s candidacy, announced it would back Kilicdaroglu.

A defeat for Kilicdaroglu would add to a long list of electoral losses to Erdogan and put pressure for him to step down as party chairman.

Erdogan’s AKP party and its allies retained a majority of seats in parliament following a legislative election that was also held on May 14. Parliamentary elections will not be repeated Sunday.

Erdogan’s party also dominated in the earthquake-hit region, winning 10 out of 11 provinces in an area that has traditionally supported the president. Erdogan came in ahead in the presidential race in eight of those provinces.

As in previous elections, Erdogan used state resources and his control of the media to reach voters.

Following the May 14 vote, international observers also pointed to the criminalization of dissemination of false information and online censorship as evidence that Erdogan had an “unjustified advantage.” The observers also said the elections showed the resilience of Turkish democracy.

Erdogan and pro-government media portrayed Kilicdaroglu, who had received the backing of the country’s pro-Kurdish party, as colluding with “terrorists” and of supporting what they described as “deviant” LGBTQ rights.

Kilicdaroglu “receives his orders from Qandil,” Erdogan repeatedly said at recent campaign rallies, a reference to the mountains in Iraq where the leadership of the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK, is based.

“We receive our orders from God and the people,” he said.

The election was being held as the country marked the 100th anniversary of its establishment as a republic, following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire.

Sunday also marks the 10th anniversary of the start of mass anti-government protests that broke out over plans to uproot trees in Istanbul’s Gezi Park, and turned into one of the most serious challenges to Erdogan’s government.

Erdogan’s response to the protests came as a harbinger of a crackdown on civil society and freedom of expression. Eight people, including philanthropist businessman Osman Kavala, architects and a filmmaker have been convicted over their alleged involvement in the protests.

___

Zeynep Bilginsoy reported from Istanbul. Mucahit Ceylan contributed from Diyarbakir, Turkey.

The post Voters in Turkey choose between Erdogan and Kilicdaroglu in presidential runoff election appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
]]>
EgyptAir flight from Cairo blows tire during landing in Saudi Arabia https://kesq.com/news/ap-national-business/2023/05/28/egyptair-flight-from-cairo-blows-tire-during-landing-in-saudi-arabia/ Sun, 28 May 2023 08:24:56 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/egyptair-flight-from-cairo-blows-tire-during-landing-in-saudi-arabia/

CAIRO (AP) — Egypt’s national airline says one of its jetliners has blown out a tire but made a safe landing at its destination in Saudi Arabia. EgyptAir says no one was hurt. Flight MS643 took off from Cairo international airport early Sunday and one of its tires burst while landing at King Abdulaziz International

The post EgyptAir flight from Cairo blows tire during landing in Saudi Arabia appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

CAIRO (AP) — Egypt’s national airline says one of its jetliners has blown out a tire but made a safe landing at its destination in Saudi Arabia. EgyptAir says no one was hurt. Flight MS643 took off from Cairo international airport early Sunday and one of its tires burst while landing at King Abdulaziz International Airport in the Saudi coastal city of Jeddah. The Boeing 738 made a safe landing on the runway and all passengers have disembarked the airplane with no injuries reported, the EgyptAir statement said. The airline didn’t elaborate on what caused the problem, and said an examination and maintenance of the plane were underway.

The post EgyptAir flight from Cairo blows tire during landing in Saudi Arabia appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
]]>
These women wanted a symbolic expression of self-love. So they married themselves https://kesq.com/news/national-world/cnn-national/2023/05/28/these-women-wanted-a-symbolic-expression-of-self-love-so-they-married-themselves/ https://kesq.com/news/national-world/cnn-national/2023/05/28/these-women-wanted-a-symbolic-expression-of-self-love-so-they-married-themselves/#respond Sun, 28 May 2023 08:01:29 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/these-women-wanted-a-symbolic-expression-of-self-love-so-they-married-themselves/ By Faith Karimi, CNN (CNN) — Brittany Rist walked down the aisle in a dress and a white veil to the song, “Girl.” “Girl, perfectly her, broken and hurt,” crooned artist SMYL in a falsetto. “Shake off the night and don’t hide your face.” It was Rist’s wedding. But there was no beaming partner waiting

The post These women wanted a symbolic expression of self-love. So they married themselves appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
By Faith Karimi, CNN

(CNN) — Brittany Rist walked down the aisle in a dress and a white veil to the song, “Girl.”

“Girl, perfectly her, broken and hurt,” crooned artist SMYL in a falsetto. “Shake off the night and don’t hide your face.”

It was Rist’s wedding. But there was no beaming partner waiting at the altar.

Wearing a rose-colored dress, the 34-year-old read her vows alone in front of a mirror in her backyard. She’d accepted her own proposal and given herself a ring. Instead of a spouse, a red velvet cake awaited her, next to a bottle of Champagne.

Rist said “I do” to herself, and committed to loving herself for better or worse.

“I vow to never settle or abandon myself in a romantic partnership ever again,” she told her reflection in the mirror. “I vow to honor my calling and live life as a work of art.”

Rist did not have an officiant or guests at her self-wedding, and toasted herself at a solo reception.

Months before the event, which she calls a “soul commitment ceremony,” she had separated from her son’s father after nine years together. She’d started working on healing her inner self, taken a vow of celibacy and signed up for therapy.

And that afternoon in November 2021, at her home in Ozark, Missouri, she punctuated her self-love journey with a statement of self-appreciation.

“I realized (that) in love and in relationships with other people, I wasn’t fully showing up and loving myself through that process, which made it really difficult to receive love from others,” she says. “We pour all of this time and money and energy into marrying other people, and we don’t ever pour that back into ourselves.”

As part of her self discovery, she decided to commit to herself.

“I thought, ‘Why don’t I just buy myself a ring? Why don’t I just love myself fully during this time, and have a little ceremony?’ It felt empowering to sit in front of the mirror and feel that I love all of me and my scars and all that makes me feel unlovable.”

The practice is called sologamy. Its adherents may be on to something, this expert says

The concept of self-marriage, or sologamy, has been around for years. In a “Sex and the City” episode that aired in August 2003, Carrie Bradshaw seeks revenge on a frenemy by telling her that she’s marrying herself and is registered at luxury shoe store Manolo Blahnik.

No data exists on how many people celebrate sologamy with ceremonies, but the practice has been explored in a handful of recent news articles.

CNN talked to four women who’ve married themselves. They describe the act as a symbolic expression of self-love and an affirmation of a deep, meaningful relationship with one’s self. They also say it has nothing to do with swearing off future partnerships with a spouse, which they say is a popular misconception.

About a year after Rist’s solo ceremony, she tied the knot with her now-husband. She wears her self-marriage ring on her right hand as a reminder of the commitment she made to herself.

Critics have slammed the practice as narcissistic. Sologamy is not legally binding in the US and is not recognized by the laws of any country. But an expert says people who commit to loving themselves after working on inner healing are on to something.

“What stands out for me about this trend is that more and more people are realizing that they need to take responsibility for their own happiness — that they can have a satisfying, meaningful life without being in a partnership,” says John Amodeo, a therapist and author of “Dancing with Fire: A Mindful Way to Loving Relationships.”

Amodeo describes it as a healthy form of narcissism. Without self-love, he says, people depend on others to feel worthy and valuable.

“It is actually a lack of self-love that leads to unhealthy narcissism,” he says. “We are then constantly needing validation from other to fill our inner emptiness.”

She had a big wedding complete with bridesmaids

Body image coach Danni Adams had planned to marry herself several years ago. She wanted a big party, filled with people she loved.

But then the pandemic hit, and she postponed her plans. Instead of a wedding, she turned to a therapist to focus on improving her self-esteem.

“I took a couple of years to really invest in myself, going to therapy, really digging deep into what it means to break generational curses, process trauma,” says Adams, now 30. “Then when I really felt good about myself, I told my therapist, ‘I think I want to get married to myself now.’”

And so she did, before about 40 guests in December at an outdoor venue in Sanford, Florida. Adams walked down the aisle to the song, “Self Love,” by Jayson Lyric, which contains the lines, “I been working on me / I been loving on me / I had to learn to love myself.”

The wedding cost about $4,000 and included nine bridesmaids, Adams says. A friend officiated. Like Rist, she read her vows in front of a full-length mirror.

As Adams walked down the aisle, she thought about what led her to this moment.

“Everything that has happened to me in my past as a child, all the things that have harmed me, I was like, this is a restart at life. I get to own my life, my own joy, my own choices. And that’s what it was about.”

After her self-wedding, Adams treated herself to a honeymoon in Tulum, Mexico. In addition to a ring, she also gave herself a necklace and two bracelets with the words, “beautiful girl, you were meant to change the world and focus on the good.”

Adams says critics have described her choice to marry herself as a cry for help.

“A lot of people have said that I have some type of mental health concerns that need to be addressed,” she says, adding she finds it interesting people “are weaponizing mental health at the time we’re saying everyone needs access to mental health services.”

Adams says if she gets married in the future, she’ll slip the wedding band right next to the one she gave herself.

“Everyone always asks, ‘Will I have to divorce myself to marry a man?’ But the real question is, ‘Why do I need to lose me in order to be married?’”

She married herself at age 77 – decades after her divorce

Dorothy Fideli never remarried after her divorce nearly five decades ago.

But this month, at age 77, she married herself in front of her three children and two dozen people at her retirement community in Goshen, Ohio.

Fideli wore a white gown, a short veil and white sneakers as she pushed her decorated walker down the aisle. Her favorite song, Celine Dion’s “Because You Loved Me,” played in the background.

“I felt beautiful, like I had won a lottery or something. I felt like a queen,” she says. “I felt important to myself … like I was somebody. It’s hard to explain the feeling – you have to feel it in your soul.”

Fideli had never worn a bridal dress. Her 1965 wedding to her husband was held at a courthouse and ended in divorce nine years later.

Fideli’s message to younger women struggling with self-esteem issues: It’s never too late to love yourself.

Her daughter, Donna Pennington, recalls the day her mother told her she wanted to marry herself.

“She didn’t have a lot of confidence growing up … But she’s come a long way in the last few years,” Pennington says. “There’s this feeling that came over her, this feeling that told her she’s enough.”

Pennington picked out a Goodwill dress for her mom and came up with a menu that included potato salad, punch and cookies shaped liked wedding bells.

The family worked with Rob Geiger, property manager of the retirement community, to plan and officiate the wedding. Geiger says he was stunned when Fideli, known affectionately there as Dottie, told him she wanted to marry herself.

“My eyes got real big and my mouth dropped open. I was like, ‘What?’ That was until she started explaining the reason why,” Geiger says. “Knowing Dottie and the challenges she had growing up, it’s like she finally discovered how to love herself, which most people do not discover in their lifetime. I took it as an honor.”

She plans to renew her vows to herself in a few years

Ena Jones married herself on her 50th birthday in September 2020. The three dozen guests thought they were attending a milestone birthday party. Then she emerged in a tiara and a knee-length white dress, carrying a bouquet of sunflowers, walking down the aisle on the arm of her husband’s father.

A three-tiered chocolate cake waited at the end of the aisle.

Jones says she’d wanted to marry herself since her husband died of cancer in 2016.

“Is it in the county marriage records that I married myself? No,” she says of her wedding in Kenansville, North Carolina. “But it’s something I felt I needed to do. This is my most important relationship … It symbolizes my love for myself for the rest of my life.”

Jones gave herself a sunflower ring. If she gets remarried, she’ll move it to the right ring finger and wear her new ring on her left hand. Either way, she plans to renew her vows on her 55th birthday.

Amodeo, the marriage and family therapist, says while sologamy can help people with their self-esteem it should not preclude connecting in a deep way with another human being. Self-love, he says, creates a solid foundation for intimate, healthy and more fulfilling relationships with others.

But the search for self-love is a lifelong process that doesn’t end with a self-marriage, he says.

“We don’t have to be perfect at it,” Amodeo says. “If we wait until we fully love ourselves before loving another, we might be in a nursing home before we feel ready for a deep intimate relationship.”

The women who spoke to CNN get that. They say they also recognize why some people don’t understand sologamy.

“I think often we are triggered or confused by things that we don’t fully understand because we haven’t experienced that,” says Rist, who now helps other women plan their self-weddings.

But she and the other women who spoke to CNN say they’re unfazed by criticism.

They say they’re proud of the inner work they’re doing to heal themselves – and they would marry themselves all over again.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2023 Cable News Network, Inc., a Warner Bros. Discovery Company. All rights reserved.

The post These women wanted a symbolic expression of self-love. So they married themselves appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
https://kesq.com/news/national-world/cnn-national/2023/05/28/these-women-wanted-a-symbolic-expression-of-self-love-so-they-married-themselves/feed/ 0 ]]>
Russia launched ‘largest drone attack’ on Ukrainian capital before Kyiv Day; 1 killed https://kesq.com/news/ap-national-business/2023/05/28/russia-launched-largest-drone-attack-on-ukrainian-capital-before-kyiv-day-1-killed/ Sun, 28 May 2023 07:56:51 +0000 https://kesq.com/news/2023/05/28/russia-launched-largest-drone-attack-on-ukrainian-capital-before-kyiv-day-1-killed/

By SUSIE BLANN and ELISE MORTON Associated Press KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Ukraine’s capital was subjected to the largest drone attack since the start of Russia’s war, local officials said, as Kyiv prepared to mark the anniversary of its founding on Sunday. At least one person was killed, but officials said scores of drones were

The post Russia launched ‘largest drone attack’ on Ukrainian capital before Kyiv Day; 1 killed appeared first on KESQ.

]]>

By SUSIE BLANN and ELISE MORTON
Associated Press

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Ukraine’s capital was subjected to the largest drone attack since the start of Russia’s war, local officials said, as Kyiv prepared to mark the anniversary of its founding on Sunday. At least one person was killed, but officials said scores of drones were shot down, demonstrating Ukraine’s air defense capability.

Russia launched the “most massive attack” on the city overnight Saturday with Iranian-made Shahed drones, said Serhii Popko, a senior Kyiv military official. The attack lasted more than five hours, with air defense reportedly shooting down more than 40 drones.

A 41-year-old man was killed and a 35-year-old woman was hospitalized when debris fell on a seven-story nonresidential building and started a fire, Kyiv Mayor Vitali Klitschko said.

Debris from a drone damaged the building of the Ukrainian Society of the Blind. On Sunday morning, organization member Volodymyr Golubenko came to pick up his things. He was helped by his son Mykola, who searched for his father’s belongings among the rubble and at the same time tried to describe to his father what his office looks like now.

“This wall on the right is destroyed and on left also,” said Mykola to his father.

Volodymyr Golubenko worked at this place for more than 40 years. He says it is a home for many blind people, because they come here to talk and support each other.

“If you don’t even have a job, it’s difficult to get a job now, because these events (war) have been going on since last year. At least people come here to chat,” said Volodymyr.

Like Golubenko, many people in his district heard the sound of Shahed drones for the first time. Among them was 36-year-old Yana, who has three boys. The family hid in a corridor all night.

“Something started to explode above us. The children ran here in fear,” said Yana.

Ukraine’s air force said that Saturday night was also record-breaking in terms of Shahed drone attacks across the country. Of the 54 drones launched, 52 were shot down by air defense systems.

Russia has repeatedly launched waves of drone attacks against Ukraine, but most are shot down. Ukraine has also claimed this month to have downed some of Russia’s hypersonic Kinzhal missiles, which Russian President Vladimir Putin has touted as providing a key competitive advantage.

In the northeastern Kharkiv province, regional Gov. Oleh Syniehubov said a 61-year-old woman and a 60-year-old man were killed in two separate shelling attacks.

Kyiv Day marks the anniversary of the city’s official founding. The day is usually celebrated with live concerts, street fairs, exhibitions and fireworks. Scaled-back festivities were planned for this year, the city’s 1,541st anniversary.

The timing of the drone attacks was likely not coincidental, Ukrainian officials said.

“The history of Ukraine is a long-standing irritant for the insecure Russians,” Ukraine’s chief presidential aide, Andriy Yermak, said on Telegram.

“Today, the enemy decided to ‘congratulate’ the people of Kyiv on Kyiv Day with the help of their deadly UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles),” Popko also wrote on the messaging app.

Local officials in Russia’s southern Krasnodar region said that air defense systems destroyed several drones as they approached the Ilsky oil refinery.

Russia’s southern Belgorod region, bordering Ukraine, also came under attack from Ukrainian forces on Saturday, local officials said. Regional Gov. Vyacheslav Gladkov reported Sunday that a 15-year-old girl and a 17-year-old boy were wounded in the shelling.

Drone attacks against Russian border regions have been a regular occurrence since the start of the invasion in February 2022, with attacks increasing last month. Earlier this month, an oil refinery in Krasnodar was attacked by drones on two straight days.

Ukrainian air defenses, bolstered by sophisticated Western-supplied systems, have been adept at thwarting Russian air attacks — both drones and aircraft missiles.

Earlier in May, Ukraine prevented an intense Russian air attack on Kyiv, shooting down all missiles aimed at the capital. The bombardment, which additionally targeted locations across Ukraine, included six Russian Kinzhal aero-ballistic hypersonic missiles, repeatedly touted by Russian President Vladimir Putin as providing a key strategic competitive advantage and among the most advanced weapons in his country’s arsenal.

Sophisticated Western air defense systems, including American-made Patriot missiles, have helped spare Kyiv from the kind of destruction witnessed along the main front line in Ukraine’s east and south. While most of the ground fighting is stalemated along that front line, both sides are targeting other territory with long-range weapons.

Against the backdrop of Saturday night’s drone attacks, Russia’s ambassador to the U.K., Andrei Kelin, warned of an escalation in Ukraine. He told the BBC on Sunday his country had “enormous resources” and it was yet to “act very seriously,” cautioning that Western supplies of weapons to Ukraine risked escalating the war to a “new dimension.” The length of the conflict, he said, “depends on the efforts in escalation of war that is being undertaken by NATO countries, especially by the U.K.”

Kelin’s comments are typical of Russian officials’ rhetoric with regard to Moscow’s military might, but contradict regular reports from the battlefield of Russian troops being poorly equipped and trained.

Also on Sunday, the death toll from Friday’s missile attack on the central Ukrainian city of Dnipro, the regional capital of the Dnipropetrovsk province, rose to four. Regional. Gov. Serhii Lysak said that three people who were considered missing were confirmed dead. There were 32 people, including two children, wounded in the attack, which struck a building containing psychology and veterinary clinics.

___

Elise Morton reported from London.

___

Follow the AP’s coverage of the war at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine

The post Russia launched ‘largest drone attack’ on Ukrainian capital before Kyiv Day; 1 killed appeared first on KESQ.

]]>
]]>